homogeny


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ho·mo·gen·e·sis

(hō'mō-jen'ĕ-sis),
Production of offspring similar to the parents, in contrast to heterogenesis.
Synonym(s): homogeny
[homo- + G. genesis, production]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

homogeny

(hə-mŏj′ə-nē, hō-)
n. pl. homoge·nies
Similarity of structure between organs or parts, possibly of dissimilar function, that are related by common descent.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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The results of table 1 show that error variance in all dependent variables in independent variable level is homogeny and we can use the method of multivariate analysis of covariance to assess this question.
Frequency is the level of homogeny of the happening of the individuals of species within the area and was calculated using the formula: Frequency = (No.
Additionally, homogeny in response to cyberbullying is not likely, as every child is unique and they react to the harassment differently.
(246) Lastly, because societies were structured on systems of class and race, marriage helped perpetuate racial and class homogeny. In many Western countries these objectives were in place even beyond the 1960s.
Dorn rejected the idea "that any people are told to destroy, or get rid of, what is most essentially themselves before admittance into the homogeny. Since there is no spiritual life worth entering," he argued, once America has destructively consolidated its national empire, "they are asked, as initiation, to subscribe to the cheap and dishonorable mentalism of the American Dream.'" The Shoshoneans, then, should be read as an essay on America coming from two distinct perspectives.
Cognitonics is a new science which looks at ways to reconcile human socio-spiritual development with increasingly rapid human intellectual development in the new context of technological advances and increased cultural homogeny. This is particularly relevant in areas such as education and informatics where children are found to be increasingly capable to control and adapt to new technological advances yet often suffer from a lack of social development or are unable to engage with aspects of their own cultural heritage.
This hypothesis relies on the premise that from season to season there is a degree of homogeny between all of the AFL football clubs with respect to fitness/conditioning programs.
in favour of more modest, specific, local and fragmented analyses.' (239) The preference for little narratives over metanarratives places the emphasis on diversity and heterogeneity (240) as opposed to the universalism of modernity, which sought equivalence and homogeny. Through this pluralistic stance comes the postmodern idea that 'all groups have a right to speak for themselves, in their own voice, and to have that voice accepted as authentic and legitimate.' (241) Postmodernists have thus 'encouraged those who have been marginalized ...
This omission elides the homogeny of the decade, making further problematic the book's reading of The Seven Year Itch (1955) alongside Pillow Talk (1959).
In order to realise difference; Among Non-Parameter tests, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests are applied as normal distribution and homogeny conditions are not occurred in gender, referee degrees and refereeing years variances.
Within the context of the Boka Kotorska, vernacular technologies and traditions should be viewed as a culturally inclusive element in the resilient development of the region and not as an architecturally deterministic antidote to global homogeny.
While there may be some homogeny in pet-care providers, truth is, if you aren't seeing someone who has experience with sporting breeds, you're making a mistake.