homogamy

(redirected from homogamous)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

ho·mog·a·my

(hō-mog'ă-mē),
Similarity of husband and wife in a specific trait.
[homo- + G. gamos, marriage]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

homogamy

(hə-mŏg′ə-mē, hō-)
n.
1. The state of having stamens and pistils that mature simultaneously.
2. The state of having only one kind of flower on a plant, such as only unisexual flowers.
3. Marriage between people who are similar to each other, especially in their sociocultural backgrounds.

ho′mo·gam′ic (-găm′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ho·mog·a·my

(hŏ-mog'ă-mē)
Similarity of husband and wife in a specific trait (e.g., ethnicity, poverty).
[homo- + G. gamos, marriage]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

homogamy

the state of having anthers and stigmas maturing at the same time.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Sixty percent of the homogamous families rated themselves as successful in the Hui ways of life, whereas twenty percent stated that they were in a continuum between both but they tended to improve their ties with the Hui cultural values, and the remaining twenty percent stated that they tried to keep a balance between both Hui and Han socio-cultural values as they desired to enjoy a good status in the Han social setup.
Like the other Arab-Muslim societies, homogamous marriages among Chaouis from Khenchela occupy until now a very important place.
Capitula homogamous or heterogamous; discoid, radiate, ligulate, or disciform; receptacle epaleate, less frequently paleate, glabrous to pubescent, alveolate, ciliate, setose to fimbriate; involucre uniseriate to multiseriate.
Contrary to their previous work, they found that "cohabiting couples appear to be more homogamous at higher levels of education than dating or married couples." More recently, Hamplova (forthcoming) compared cohabiting and married couples across three distinct welfare regimes using the European Social Survey from 2002 and 2004, and showed that the differences between married and unmarried couples largely depend upon the degree to which cohabitation is institutionalized in any given society.
At the start of the period, the most homogamous groups were the sons of farmers (II), and to a lesser extent those of crofters and farm workers (V).
Based on the popular television programs of "Bachelor," "Bachelorette," "Blind Date," "Elimidate," and "'Next" an in-class exercise was developed and executed in five sections of a marriage and family course at a large southeastern university whereby students identified a homogamous (homogamy = similarity) partner and went out on a "real" date.
Capitulescences unilaterally spicate, racemose to paniculate; capitula sessile to pedunculate, homogamous, ligulate, one- to five-flowered; receptacle epaleate; involucre multiseriate.
As a result, marriages among university graduates are likely to be more "homogamous" with respect to academic ability and family socioeconomic status in the United States but these differences are unlikely to have significant effects on marriages between those with and without university credentials.
Shehan and Bock (1990) reported that religiosity does have a positive impact on marital happiness, but only among homogamous Catholics.
Capitulescences monocephalous or paniculate to corymbose, terminal; capitula pedunculate, homogamous or heterogamous, radiate; receptacle epaleate, setose; involucre multiseriate.
Homogamous late marriage among professionals and constantly postponed marriage among black people are offered as evidence of this hypothesis.