homocentric


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ho·mo·cen·tric

(hō'mō-sen'trik),
Having the same center; denoting rays that meet at a common focus. Compare: heterocentric (1).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

homocentric

(hō″mō-sĕn′trĭk) [″ + kentron, center]
Having the same center.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, writes Merchant, if a major earthquake is likely to occur in Los Angeles within the next 75 years, a "homocentric" ethic would simply forbid licensing construction of a nuclear reactor on a fault line.
Both concepts are homocentric because each envisions perpetual occupation of the planet by one species over all others; the primary objective is perpetuating and improving the lot of humans and not the optimization of the integrity and health of the planet's ecologic life support system and natural capital.
homocentric. (191) The ethics of ecofeminism challenge this view by
By contrast, the Semitic religions have a homocentric value-orientation, which facilitated the exploitation of nature by humanity for its own welfare.
We might approach an inquiry into the nature of our commitments from the perspective of environmental philosophy, and attempt to resolve the dispute between ecocentric philosophies that argue for protecting the environment because of its inherent or intrinsic value and homocentric, welfarist philosophies that value only human well-being as expressed in the private preferences people have for various goods and services.
Chapter 7 examines, rather, the relation between the traveler's vision of nine concentric circles wheeling around a fixed point in Canto 28 and the homocentric Aristotelian universe.
It believes the whole Earth is in a period of transition from the homocentric industrial culture based on self-interest, survival of the fittest, and materialism, to an ecocentric Gaiain culture based on belonging, cooperation, community and mutual respect.
Broadly speaking, this historical shift is analogous to that between the notion of a homocentric universe which existed up to the Renaissance and the seventeenth-century concept of a scientific universe which gradually replaced it.
He contends that homocentric notions of the world are at variance with biocentric notions of the world.
Descartes' intention to "furnish scientific therapy against a foolishly homocentric appeal to purposive notions" (James Collins, Descartes' Philosophy of Nature [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1971], 90), thus, is quite effectively contrasted with thinkers who did not engage in such misappeals, who not only distinguished and ordered methodologies differently but also found a defense of philosophical analyses of nature in many of the same Scholastic sources that Descartes had utilized.
Some, such as Robert Bellarmine, held for a fluid-heaven through which planets move "like fish in the sea"; others, such as Benedict Pereira, continued to defend Aristotle's universe of homocentric spheres; yet others, such as Christopher Grienberger, inclined at first toward Copernicus's heliocentrism.