homeostasis


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homeostasis

 [ho″me-o-sta´sis]
the tendency of biological systems to maintain relatively constant conditions in the internal environment while continuously interacting with and adjusting to changes originating within or outside the system. See also balance and equilibrium. adj., adj homeostat´ic. The term is considered by some to be misleading in that the word element-stasis implies a static or fixed and unmoving state, whereas homeostasis actually involves continuous motion, adaptation, and change in response to environmental factors.

It is through homeostatic mechanisms that body temperature is kept within normal range, the osmotic pressure of the blood and its hydrogen ion concentration (pH) is kept within strict limits, nutrients are supplied to cells as needed, and waste products are removed before they accumulate and reach toxic levels of concentration. These are but a few examples of the thousands of homeostatic control systems within the body. Some of these systems operate within the cell and others operate within an aggregate of cells (organs) to control the complex interrelationships among the various organs.

ho·me·o·sta·sis

(hō'mē-ō-stā'sis, -os'tă-sis), Although the principal stress correctly falls on the third syllable in this word, the pronunciation homeosta'sis is more usual in the U.S. Do not confuse this word with hemostasis.
1. The state of equilibrium (balance between opposing pressures) in the body with respect to various functions and to the chemical compositions of the fluids and tissues.
2. The processes through which such bodily equilibrium is maintained.
[homeo- + G. stasis, standing]

homeostasis

(hō′mē-ō-stā′sĭs)
n.
A state of equilibrium, as in an organism or cell, maintained by self-regulating processes: The kidneys maintain homeostasis in the body by regulating the amount of salt and water excreted.

ho′me·o·stat′ic (-stăt′ĭk) adj.

homeostasis

Physiology The dynamic constancy of the internal environment; the self-regulating biologic processes that maintain an organism's equilibrium; the ability to maintain a constant state under various conditions of stress

ho·me·o·sta·sis

(hō'mē-ō-stā'sis)
1. The state of equilibrium (balance between opposing pressures) in the body with respect to various functions and to the chemical compositions of the fluids and tissues.
2. The processes through which such bodily equilibrium is maintained.
[G. homoios, similar, + stasis, a standing, fr. istēmi, to stand]

homeostasis

The principle of self-regulating information feedback by which constant conditions are maintained in a biological system such as the human body. Homeostasis is essential to life and applies to thousands of bodily parameters. Some of the more obvious examples are temperature regulation, blood acidity control, blood pressure control, heart rate, blood sugar levels and hormone secretion.

homeostasis

the maintenance by an organism of a constant internal environment; an example is the regulation of blood sugar levels by insulin. The process involves self-adjusting mechanisms in which the maintenance of a particular level is initiated by the substance to be regulated. See also FEEDBACK MECHANISM.

Homeostasis

The tendency of a family system to maintain internal stability and resist change.

ho·me·o·sta·sis

(hō'mē-ō-stā'sis)
1. State of equilibrium in the body with respect to various functions and to the chemical compositions of fluids and tissues.
2. Processes through which bodily equilibrium is maintained.
[G. homoios, similar, + stasis, a standing, fr. istēmi, to stand]
References in periodicals archive ?
When the patient and control groups were compared according to the NLR and thiol/disulfide homeostasis parameters, NLR, disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol, the average values were found to be significantly higher (respectively, p<0.001, 0.013 and 0.009) and the native thiol and total thiol average values were found to be significantly lower (respectively, p=0.004 and 0.001) in the patient group compared to the control group.
Other studies demonstrated that thiol-disulphide homeostasis declined in hypertension (HT) patients compared with the control group.
In the present study, the reason for the disturbance in the thiol/disulfide homeostasis and increased OS may be due to the renal vascular hemorrhage, inflammation, and ischemia caused by ESWL treatment, which is consistent with previous reports.9,22 IMA level was increased early after ESWL, which was considered to be consistent with ischemia.
Parameters of thiol/disulphide homeostasis in follicular fluid between groups are demonstrated in Table 2.
So, the disturbance of the homeostasis set in motion supply-demand forces to restore the status quo.
Tables 1 and 2 present insulin and glucose profiles of survey subjects which meet the numerical criteria of optimal insulin homeostasis. Specifically, the peak blood insulin concentration accompanied by unimpaired glucose tolerance in a female adult is below 20 ulU/mL and a male subject is below 25 ulU/mL.
Patients with chronic pancreatitis, malignant diseases, renal failure, liver failure, heart failure, myocardial infarction, rheumatic diseases, and immunosuppressive disorders were excluded because these conditions may have significant effects on thiol/disulfide homeostasis.
Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate dynamic thiol/disulphide homeostasis in patients with FMS.
Protein homeostasis, which is important in oncology, neurodegenerative and other disorders, involves a tightly regulated network of pathways controlling the biogenesis, folding, transport and degradation of proteins.
Perturbations of these pathways or ECM homeostasis due to inflammation, toxins, chemotherapy, and nutritional deprivation can substantially affect the ISC niche, leading to increased susceptibility to intestinal diseases.
Magnesium (Mg) and also other biometals (BM) play an essential role in regulating a plethora of biological processes such as (1) metabolism of biomacromolecules, (2) cell division and proliferation, (3) normal mitochondrial homeostasis and energy production, (4) normal redox homeostasis, (5) antioxidant signaling, and (6) crosstalk between major signal cascades.