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home

 [hōm]
a place where someone lives.
home health care services provided by a certified agency using an interdisciplinary team to meet the needs of patients being cared for in out-of-hospital settings such as private homes, boarding homes, hospices, shelters, and so on. Caregivers include professional and practical nurses, nursing assistants, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, and other professionals. The rising costs of hospitalization and the impact of diagnosis-related group (DRG) reimbursement for Medicare patients have contributed to the phenomenal increase in home health care agencies in the United States. Additionally, technological advances now make it possible for patients to receive many treatments at home that formerly were administered only in a hospital. Examples include oxygen therapy, intravenous drug perfusion (including administration of antineoplastics and antibiotics), and peritoneal dialysis. See also home health agency.

A variety of agencies and services are available in many communities. Some are privately owned and operated for profit (proprietary), others are affiliated with hospitals, and some are private nonprofit agencies. As more third-party payers such as federal and state governments and large insurance companies certify these agencies for reimbursement, growth in the number and type can be expected to continue, and more complicated types of care may be provided in the homes of patients.
home maintenance, impaired a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability to independently maintain a safe and growth-promoting immediate environment. Related factors are any illness, injury, or knowledge deficit that can contribute to a person's inability to attend to cleaning, repairing, and maintaining the home and providing basic needs and comforts for the self and family members. Age-related factors might include special needs of an infant or of an elderly person with functional disabilities or sensory loss. In some cases impaired management of home maintenance could be related to insufficient family organization or planning, inadequate financial resources, or impaired cognitive or emotional functioning.

Nursing interventions are focused on determining the nature of the problem, assessing the family's ability to deal with it, and identifying available resources for assistance. Plans for utilizing available resources are developed with family members. These might include procuring a part-time homemaker, obtaining supportive assistance such as legal aid or nutritional care, or providing therapeutic care by nurses, speech therapists, physical therapists or other professionals who are involved in home health care.
nursing home see nursing home.
residential care home (rest home) a residence where room, board, and personal care are provided for individuals who need assistance and supervision. The focus is generally on dependent elderly persons who cannot live independently but do not require regular nursing care, and on younger individuals who have mental illness or mental retardation.

Home

(hōm),
Everard, English surgeon, 1756-1832. See: Home lobe.

home

As defined in the UK, the place where a client or patient currently resides (permanently or temporarily), except when he or she is a hospital inpatient.

home

A residence where individuals return regularly to eat, live, recreate, rest, and sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
The growing digitalized communication stimulates us to develop a conceptualization of home that is grounded in the "connected presence" notion (Licoppe, 2004) and the related "connected migrant" notion (Diminescu, 2008), where homeliness relates to a continuous presence despite the distance involved.
The themes of care and homeliness attract Heidegger's reflection at this point, as they have in his other reflections on Holderlin, but here homeliness takes center stage and stays there for the remainder of the lecture.
It's a spot which provides my idea of the holy grail of hospitality - a little bit of luxury presented with relaxed homeliness.
But I have to confess that what put me off for a long time to even check out the menu was the choice of typeface: Mistral, or some variation of it, a fauxhandwritten font that is meant to convey homeliness but managed to evoke amateurish intentions not quite fulfilled.
Every time she -- as Fanny Brice -- referred to her homeliness it didn't ring true.
We simply all converged on Butlins: a camp that had all the allure and homeliness of a maximum security prison.
Aidan must have cherished""What might get you off the East Coast train before Edinburgh is the lost-in-time peacefulness of the broad landscape and the picturesque homeliness of Durham itself"
This gorgeous carpet has all the homeliness of a chunky knitted jumper, but is practical enough to use with a small herd of feral children rampaging around your home.
The interior of untreated wood and exposed concrete pillars add to the homeliness of the space, although the plasticky chandeliers feel decidedly out of place.
How I loved that room; it was so ordered and peaceful, the epitome of homeliness.
I love the basic homeliness of Ikea and I love their prints, their rugs and of course their prices