home monitor

home monitor

a monitor for heart and respiratory rate, generally used for infants believed to be at risk for sudden infant death syndrome or apnea.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Home Monitor can be expanded with the D-Link Home Energy Monitoring Starter Kit.
Patients received training in using the home monitor, which took about 30 minutes, and then used the device at home for 2-4 weeks.
It's a good idea for a doctor or nurse to observe you using your home monitor in the office before you use it at home, to be sure that you are doing it correctly.
We're proud to welcome several of Blink's supply chain partners as investors in the product, a validation of our relationship-based approach to product development," said Peter Besen, CEO of Immedia, the company behind the home monitor and its unique technology.
Intervention patients received the same services, but also weighed themselves on an interactive scale, measured their blood pressure, and took their pulse daily using an automated home monitor (Philips Medical Systems, Bothell, Wash.
If the criteria in the consensus panel report are applied by physicians," says Little, "I'd anticipate a significant drop in home monitor use for infantile apnea.
The AT&T home monitor service combines live and recorded video (non-audio) capabilities with a range of environmental sensor options to provide customers with a powerful, flexible toolkit to help them stay connected to the people and things they value most.
5 million investment, HomMed is introducing its third-generation home monitor and updated software.
In 1997, prototype home monitors were trialled on six children who were being treated at the Freeman, and with home test results correlating extremely well with hospital results, the monitors were further developed to the hand-held models of today.
Overall, study participants using home monitors saw their blood pressure dip by 2 to 3 points, and most of the studies came out in favor of home monitoring over office-based measurements alone though the differences were generally small.
Though Wilkes' coalition reports that many groups are backing its plan--including the Association for Protection of the Elderly in Lexington, South Carolina, and the Nursing Home Monitors in Godfrey, Illinois--some weren't pleased with the fact that the group presented them in a press release announcing the event as participants when they were only attendees.
Then the women were divided into three groups: Group One received home monitors and a daily phone call from a nurse; Group Two received a daily phone call but no monitor; and Group Three received only a weekly call.