home infusion therapy


Also found in: Acronyms.

home infusion therapy

The IV administration of therapeutics–analgesics, antibiotics, chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition–outside of a formal healthcare environment. See Hyperalimentation, Patient-controlled analgesics, TPN.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grand View said that the rising significance of cost-containment in home infusion in comparison with in-patient settings is a high-impact rendering driver of the home infusion therapy market.
The extent of Medicare FFS coverage of home infusion therapy depends on whether the beneficiary is homebound, as well as other factors related to the beneficiary's condition and treatment needs.
Contributors introduce the concepts and practices of home infusion therapy and home nutrition support, then describe preparing the patient for discharge on home nutrition support (including conducting screening and assessment), ensuring access for and providing enteral nutrition at home for adults and children, ensuring vascular access in adult or pediatric parental nutrition patients, nursing, performing specialized support (including that for hyperemesis gravidarum and oral diets), and arranging for reimbursement for home nutrition support.
Offering a comprehensive range of home respiratory medications and therapy, home infusion therapy & home medical equipment services, Apria Healthcare is America's leading provider of home healthcare products and services.
After working for years in the home infusion therapy industry, Julia Robinson realized northeast Arkansas wasn't being properly served.
Health Quest also developed a 22,000 bed institutional pharmacy, a contract rehabilitation therapy company and a home infusion therapy business.
To better define the epidemiology of BSIs in the home-care setting, in 1995 the Hospital Infections Program conducted a prospective multicenter study of home infusion therapy patients.
An improvement in quality and availability of home care medical technology, particularly in the area of home infusion therapy has accompanied the recent trends in home health care growth.
Home infusion therapy is a convenient and cost-effective alternative to treatment of hemophilia in the health-care setting (5).
Hospitals and physicians may choose to collaborate for joint marketing purposes--for instance a group of oncologists and a hospital both may benefit from a cancer center located at the hospital, or a group of infectious disease specialists and a hospital may both benefit from a home infusion therapy program that the hospital owns or that they own together--but, regardless of how cooperative they may be, in all likelihood the physicians work within one corporate entity, a group practice, and the hospital managers work within another corporate entity, the hospital, and each entity sends separate bills for separate services, defined by facility fees and professional fees, to the patients (or their insurers) that they treat together.
Home infusion therapy, the delivery of fluid to the body by an IV line, is a widely noted advance in technology.

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