holophrase


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holophrase

(hŏl′ō-frāz″)
A single word, usually a verb, used to convey a variety of meanings. It is common in the development of speech in toddlers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The holophrase marks a linguistic category, but the paraholophrase belongs to literary criticism.
So you're saying, the paraholophrase does on a rhetorical level what the holophrase does on a linguistic level in Aboriginal languages.
Except that the sentence is replaced by the Aboriginal holophrase, extended to the English language, and the novel by--
This figure is modeled on the holophrase, after all.
Holophrases are one-word sentences, words that express a complete sentence or clause.
And Native holophrases are probably very different?
Yes, holophrases in Indigenous languages are much more complex than your coffee example.
So my coffee example only pretends to be a complete sentence, whereas holophrases actually are complete sentences.
Holophrases are the building blocks of Indigenous discourse; they
Because holophrases are capable of expressing both the event and everyone and everything involved in it.
Strictly speaking, then, holophrases aren't just about morphology, about how words are put together.
5) "This element is often the one designating the 'new' aspect of the situation, and so is it is possible to think of holophrases as kind of primitive predications, with joint attentional formats serving as kind of topical ground (although young children are clearly not adult-like in explicitly establishing shared topics with an interlocutor and then predicating something about the topic that is new for her, the interlocutor)" (Tomasello, 2000: 65).