holism

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ho·lism

(hō'lizm),
1. The principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through the analysis of a phenomenon as a complete entity in itself. Compare: atomism.
[G. holos, entire]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

holism

(hō′lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory that living matter or reality is made up of organic or unified wholes that are greater than the simple sum of their parts.
2. A holistic investigation or system of treatment.

ho′list n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

holism

Psychiatry An approach to the study of the individual in totality, rather than as an aggregate of separate physiologic, psychologic, and social characteristics
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ho·lism

(hō'lizm)
1. Principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis as a complete entity in itself.
[G. holos, entire]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The holist, like the quietist, takes the "wide" view of experience.
Rest of the participants fallen in G-5 which had characteristics of low prior knowledge, high WMC and deep holist. Further the participants of each sub-group were equally divided into experimental and control groups.
Using this framework, Scerri argues that Western states have transitioned from a dualist cultural grammar where citizenship was understood within commitments to the control of nature, the distinction between public and private, social contractualism, the distribution of social rights, and political debate over the redistribution of wealth to a holist cultural grammar dedicated to 'achieving authenticity and self-realization within nature' (p.
In this respect, approaches of IR could be categorized in terms of this debate as holist, individualist approaches and syntheses (structuration approach).
graduate-level nursing students suggests that sachets infused with lavender and rosemary essential oils reduced test anxiety and pulse rates (Holist. Nurs.
(2.) "African geranium (EPs 7630), part I", S M Ross, Holist Nurs Pract.
face both the in-principle reductionists and the in-principle holist."
J Holist Nurs 2013 31: 4 DOI: 10.1177/0898010112474222
In fact, I think that an "intellectual holist" like Michael Walzer has a point when casting doubt on the possibility of "detaching thin from thick morality," insisting that both "are products of social history, thick being prior to thin" (122).
They elaborate that totalisations of values do not always have to result in representations of a social whole structured along holist lines.