holism

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ho·lism

(hō'lizm),
1. The principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through the analysis of a phenomenon as a complete entity in itself. Compare: atomism.
[G. holos, entire]

holism

/hol·ism/ (hōl´izm) the conception of man as a functioning whole.holis´tic

holism

(hō′lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory that living matter or reality is made up of organic or unified wholes that are greater than the simple sum of their parts.
2. A holistic investigation or system of treatment.

ho′list n.

holism

[hō′lizəm]
Etymology: Gk, holos, whole
a philosophical concept in which an entity is seen as more than the sum of its parts. Holism is prominent in current approaches to psychology; biology; nursing; medicine; and other scientific, sociological, and educational fields of study and practice. Also spelled wholism.

holism

Psychiatry An approach to the study of the individual in totality, rather than as an aggregate of separate physiologic, psychologic, and social characteristics

ho·lism

(hō'lizm)
1. Principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis as a complete entity in itself.
[G. holos, entire]

holism (hōˑ·li·zm),

n 1. the characteristic of being whole, complete, interconnected, indivisible, ordered. In medicine the concept is used to address the entire individual and context rather than focusing only on a part or diagnosis.
2. in biology, the concept according to which the sum of a phenomenon or system cannot be measured, reduced, or observed at the level below that of the entire system.
References in periodicals archive ?
He says that holists not only plan to study the whole society by an impossible method but also plan to control and reconstruct it as a whole.
Holist ways of thinking refers to a way of thinking in which a group often represents individuals, whereas an individualist mode of thinking will take an individual to represent a group.
The second error of holists may lie in their overextension of Heisenberg's Principle of Uncertainty and/or Goedel's Theorem which some of them use to imply that the physical and natural sciences can make no predictions about nature, and never could.
This is the central question: whether economics today is monist in its hard core (axiological) or holist (management, for instance, includes a variety of values).
The holist cognitive style appears to be an important prerequisite for fully enjoying the benefits of the P+F interface.
We were always nervous of those Richard Rogers ideas on glass and transparency, the Holist spokesman went on.
70), and considers as examples of this holist paradigm his book designs, frames for pictures, illustrations for translations, and assorted correlations between his translations and their respective originals.
One could be a holist about the reason-giving force of considerations and yet believe moral concepts capable of nontrivial exhaustive definitions.
Historically, the notion of societe civile, as it emerged in the writings of the philosophes, typically oscillated between partial and holist definitions, designating rising sectors such as the economy or culture, but simultaneously expanding its scope towards all social sectors and units (Heilbron, 87, 91).
On the other hand the holist, or 'social realist', approaches within the same domain tends to emphasize ways in which individual behavior is shaped by the wider collectiveness or normative frameworks within which individuals are situated.
The differences identified by Pask include tendencies to adopt what he termed holist and serialist approaches to learning.