holism


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ho·lism

(hō'lizm),
1. The principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through the analysis of a phenomenon as a complete entity in itself. Compare: atomism.
[G. holos, entire]

holism

/hol·ism/ (hōl´izm) the conception of man as a functioning whole.holis´tic

holism

(hō′lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory that living matter or reality is made up of organic or unified wholes that are greater than the simple sum of their parts.
2. A holistic investigation or system of treatment.

ho′list n.

holism

[hō′lizəm]
Etymology: Gk, holos, whole
a philosophical concept in which an entity is seen as more than the sum of its parts. Holism is prominent in current approaches to psychology; biology; nursing; medicine; and other scientific, sociological, and educational fields of study and practice. Also spelled wholism.

holism

Psychiatry An approach to the study of the individual in totality, rather than as an aggregate of separate physiologic, psychologic, and social characteristics

ho·lism

(hō'lizm)
1. Principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis as a complete entity in itself.
[G. holos, entire]

holism (hōˑ·li·zm),

n 1. the characteristic of being whole, complete, interconnected, indivisible, ordered. In medicine the concept is used to address the entire individual and context rather than focusing only on a part or diagnosis.
2. in biology, the concept according to which the sum of a phenomenon or system cannot be measured, reduced, or observed at the level below that of the entire system.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this story, Hemingway explores his ecological consciousness of ecological holism.
Then why the holism of social facts seems so frightening?
First, we may think that the world described by power holism is a brute fact; there is no explanation as to why certain properties fit the way they do.
Quine's holism is a semantic one, holding that the meaning of a sentence is determined by the evidence that would count for or against it, and also one of confirmation, maintaining that the unit of empirical significance is the whole of science.
In quantum theory, holism is manifest in the property known as "entanglement.
We must teach patients that health is not a factor of the quantity or quality of the medical care, but rather each of us embracing holism.
In an argument focusing primarily on Lawrence's late poetry, written when he knew (though he never acknowledged) that he was dying, I diverge from most previous interpretations by tying Lawrence's private medical crises more closely to the then much-debated problem of the "crisis of medicine" and the emergence of the critical discourse known as "medical holism.
His topics include the foundational dogma of geometry, sophisticated methodological holism, infinity and nature, the counterweight of finitude, the beauty of symmetry, symmetry and culture, the familiarity of three-dimensionality, the difference of higher-dimensionality, and eight theses on the unfinished work of geometry.
An activist for holism, her works have been found in South Africa, Japan, and Sweden.
Raja's longevity with the group has also equipped him with a comprehensive and diverse experience across all channels and a holism that has now become a prerequisite in the field of communications.
A strong sense of holism runs through this comprehensive book devoted to palliative care.