holism


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ho·lism

(hō'lizm),
1. The principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through the analysis of a phenomenon as a complete entity in itself. Compare: atomism.
[G. holos, entire]

holism

/hol·ism/ (hōl´izm) the conception of man as a functioning whole.holis´tic

holism

(hō′lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory that living matter or reality is made up of organic or unified wholes that are greater than the simple sum of their parts.
2. A holistic investigation or system of treatment.

ho′list n.

holism

[hō′lizəm]
Etymology: Gk, holos, whole
a philosophical concept in which an entity is seen as more than the sum of its parts. Holism is prominent in current approaches to psychology; biology; nursing; medicine; and other scientific, sociological, and educational fields of study and practice. Also spelled wholism.

holism

Psychiatry An approach to the study of the individual in totality, rather than as an aggregate of separate physiologic, psychologic, and social characteristics

ho·lism

(hō'lizm)
1. Principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis as a complete entity in itself.
[G. holos, entire]

holism (hōˑ·li·zm),

n 1. the characteristic of being whole, complete, interconnected, indivisible, ordered. In medicine the concept is used to address the entire individual and context rather than focusing only on a part or diagnosis.
2. in biology, the concept according to which the sum of a phenomenon or system cannot be measured, reduced, or observed at the level below that of the entire system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Holism What should be produced, how it should be (Morin, 1990) produced, when it should be produced, how much should be produced and pricing (Humphrey & Schmitz, 2001).
In the absence of such information, the ecological and evolutionary principles which are accounted for by the pattern illustrated in Figure 2 allow first approximations of sustainable harvests that are far superior to those used in conventional forms of management-superior in their holism, objectivity, and the complexity taken into account (Fowler, 2009).
The model emphasizing change, holism, long-term relationship, and complementary relationships, is a third generation of I-Ching wisdom.
Finlay's (2001) assertion is that it is not always necessary to take a holistic approach and that "we need to understand that holism means different things, at different times, to different people (and professions)" (p.
Four main themes were derived from the data: client-driven process, holism, reading process, and debriefing.
His insights are especially appropriate today with our return to the idea of holism as his Flower Remedies work at the level of mind/emotions and the healing effect is thereby felt in the body.
In his 2001 book Techoromanticism: Digital Narrative, Holism, and the Romance of the Real, Richard Coyne discusses the romanticization of digital technology, contrasting it with rationalism and pragmatism.
Sociological case studies of organizations reinforce the guiding principles of the strategy effectively, particularly the holism they demand, but students searching for such scholarship invariably find high quality and useful case studies by scholars who study management and leadership.
Maybe the holism of Jewish religious life--connected with the holism of body and soul--is impossible in America.
King suggests that Engaged Buddhism exhibits features of several Western systems while showing the prevalence of such ideas as natural law, holism and an outlook that is nonadversarial and pragmatic.
Following a discussion of the East Asian philosophical and artistic theories of holism and humanity's place within the cosmos, she goes on to consider contemporary western environmental art and its role in fostering a more inclusive vision of the world.
Davidson argues that holism has in fact two aspects: semantic holism (that is, the holism of meaning) and epistemologic holism (that is, he holism of knowledge).