hold

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hold,

v to possess by reason of a lawful title.
hold harmless clause,
n a contract provision in which one party to the contract promises to be responsible for liability incurred by the other party. Hold harmless clauses frequently appear in the following contexts: (1) Contracts between dental benefits organizations and an individual dental professional often contain a promise by the dental professional to reimburse the dental benefits organization for any liability the organization incurs because of dental treatment provided to beneficiaries of the organization's dental benefits plan. This may include a promise to pay the dental benefits organization's attorney fees and related costs. (2) Contracts between dental benefits organizations and a group plan sponsor may include a promise by the dental benefits organization to assume responsibility for disputes between a beneficiary of the group plan and an individual dental professional when the dental professional's charge exceeds the amount the organization pays for the service on behalf of the beneficiary. If the dental professional takes action against the patient to recover the difference between the amount billed by the dental professional and the amount paid by the organization, the dental benefits organization will take over the defense of the claim and will pay any judgments and court costs.
References in periodicals archive ?
It says: "Political correctness is a doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
In this lavishly-illustrated 6x6"book on our nearest neighbor in the cosmos (and a few other moons), Carlowicz, a science writer/editor with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, holds forth knowledgeably on the science, and mythological, religious, and popular culture associations with the moon.
A color-bar test pattern on the screen casts a gently moving rainbow on the wall as an elderly Englishwoman holds forth on various methods of high-speed typing, perfume, and, predominantly, the BBC Radio 4 programming--plays, the news, the shipping forecast, Women's Hour--that is her daily companion.