holdfast


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holdfast

(hōld′făst′)
n.
1. Any of various devices used to fasten something securely.
2. Biology An organ or structure of attachment, especially the basal, rootlike formation by which certain seaweeds or other algae are attached to a substrate.

holdfast

the basal part of the stripe (stalk) of large seaweeds such as Fucus , Laminaria, attaching the plant to the substrate.
References in periodicals archive ?
She has also asked Sansa (Sophie Turner) to go to the holdfast. Sansa is confused by this.
Furthermore, crude fiber levels in whole plants, stipes, and holdfast were greater in Talquilla, whereas levels were higher in fronds from Lagunillas.
For longer-term production without reseeding, best forage candidates are mostly perennials, including Flecha tall fescue, hardinggrass (Perla koleagrass, Holdfast, Advanced AT) or Berber orchardgrass, as a mix or a monoculture.
Only 12 local governments answered the second round: Holdfast Bay and Melbourne in Australia, Mataro, Mostoles and San Cugat in Spain, Austin, Charlotte, Maricopa, San Jose, Scottsdale and Tucson in the USA, and Lulea in Sweden.
For management purposes, harvesting by cutting from portions of the frond rather than uprooting/trawling of the entire kelp is more ecologically friendly as the epiphytes and holdfast fauna attached to the plants are not lost.
Beyond humor, I suspect what's keeping some places from being swept away is the human equivalent of "holdfast," that nebulous, Super Glue-like something that keeps bullwhip kelp fixated to the ocean floor despite storm after storm.
We are lucky to have two very good books written by David Benzing in which he refers at length to the different types of roots, their structure, moisture and nutrient take-up, and why he believes that roots on Tillandsia perform only one function and that is as a "holdfast root."
Each individual was collected by prying its holdfast free from the rock, taking care to avoid damaging any portion of the organism.
This type of fossil usually has a long and narrow but flexible, gently tapering tube with a cup-like attachment disc, or holdfast, at the pointed end, which once anchored the organism to the sea floor, or to a hard surface such as a shell or another Sphenothallus.
Le Guin's Hainish novels, James Blish's Cities in Flight quartet, Suzy McKee Charnas's Holdfast Chronicles, Frank Herbert's Dune series, and Cordwainer Smith's stories of the Instumentality of Mankind.