holandric


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Related to holandric: holandric gene, holandric inheritance

holandric

 [hol-an´drik]
inherited exclusively through the male descent; transmitted through genes located on the Y chromosome.

hol·an·dric

(hol-an'drik),
Related to genes located on the Y chromosome.
[G. holos, entire, + aner, human male]

holandric

(hō-lăn′drĭk, hŏ-)
adj.
Relating to a trait encoded by a gene or genes specific to the Y-chromosome and therefore occurring only in males.

hol·an·dric

(hol-an'drik)
Related to genes located on the Y chromosome.

holandric

(of genes) carried on the Y-SEX CHROMOSOME and transmitted via the HETEROGAMETIC SEX. In mammals, holandric genes are passed on from father to son.
References in periodicals archive ?
The location of spermathecae in the testicular segments, with one pair of pores anterior to the testes, is unique in holandric species, and to date it has been observed only in this species, and in two species of Geogenia and one of Tritogenia, which are also discussed in this paper.
This species obviously differs from the proandric species accredited to the lesothoensis species-group in being holandric, with setae arranged in four regular rows and no discrepancy in the arrangement.
The presence of spermathecal pores in both testicular segments in holandric species is unusual for microchaetids, and was noted only in benhami and mkuzi.
The location of the anterior spermathecae and their pores in pre-testicular segments is unique among holandric species, and in Geogenia is known only in namaensis, distasmosa and quaera.
distasmosa differs from species accredited to the lesothoensis species-group in being holandric, having the setae arranged in four regular rows and not demonstrating discrepancy in their arrangement.
Location of spermathecal pores, although being difficult to trace, in 8/9 and 9/10, is known also in holandric distasmosa.
Their spermathecal pores have been observed during species dissection in intersegmental furrow 9/10 and 10/11, which is unique in the holandric genus Tritogenia.