puff adder

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puff adder

n.
A venomous African viper (Bitis arietans) having crescent-shaped yellowish markings.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Less frequently we find diamondback rattlesnakes, crawfish snakes, garter snakes, grass snakes, water moccasins, coral snakes, hognose snakes and mud snakes.
When Gerald happened on a death-feigning hognose snake in the wild, he flipped it back to its normal, stomach-on-the-ground position.
Wayne Eastburn / The Register-Guard Andrew Black, 8, shows off his face painting and a hognose snake at the Summer Jam on Saturday.
Microhabitat Selection by the Eastern Hognose Snake, Heterodon platirhinos.
Our earliest records based on specimens were an eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) collected in Erie County, Ohio, in 1886 (OSUZM833) and a Lake Erie water snake (Nerodia s.
Mating and nesting behavior of the eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) in the northern portion of its range.
The western hognose snake, Heterodon nasicus ranges from southern Canada to San Luis Potosi, Mexico and southeastern Arizona to central Illinois where it frequents prairies, open woodlands and floodplains of rivers; in the extreme western part of its range it occurs in semidesert habitats (Stebbins 2003).
Five common reptiles expected at IIA, but not encountered, were stinkpot turtle (Sternotherus odoratus), northern ringneck snake (Diadophis punctatus), midland brown snake (Storeria dekayi), eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos), and five-lined skink (Eumeces fasciatus).
The timing device was further tested and used to continuously monitor thermal selection of an eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platyrhinos) by recording hourly [T.sub.b]'s over a 2-wk period.
The six-lined racerunner (Cnemidophorus sexlineatus), bullsnake (Pituophis melanoleucus), and eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinus) were also relatively common; however, I observed each in only two counties in northwest Indiana.