histrionic personality disorder

(redirected from Histrionic personality)
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histrionic personality disorder

 
a personality disorder characterized by dramatic, attention-seeking, overly reactive, and intensely expressed behavior. Individuals with this disorder are prone to emotional display, such as angry outbursts and tantrums. They are often perceived by others as shallow and fickle; in their relationships they may be superficially charming but are frequently demanding and inconsiderate of others. Their behavior is often inappropriately sexually seductive or provocative, and they demand to be the center of attention, often using physical appearance to draw attention. Emotional expression is shallow and rapidly shifting. They may make manipulative suicide threats or attempts.

his·tri·on·ic per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

1. an enduring and pervasive pattern of behavior in adulthood characterized by excessive, dramatic, and shallow emotionality; attention-seeking; and demands for approval and reassurance, beginning in early childhood and present in a variety of contexts.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

histrionic personality disorder

n.
A personality disorder characterized by excessive emotionality and persistent attention-seeking behavior.
A state characterised by pervasive and excessive emotionality and attention-seeking behaviour, which begins by early adulthood, and is present in various contexts

histrionic personality disorder

Hysterical personality disorder Psychiatry A state characterized by '…pervasive and excessive emotionality and attention-seeking behavior', which begins by early adulthood, and is present in various contexts; HPD is diagnosed by the finding of 5 or more of a list of criteria.
Histrionic Personality Disorder ≥ 5 criteria  
1. Person is uncomfortable unless he/she is center of attention
.
2. Interactions with others may be sexually inappropriate or provocative
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3. Volatile and/or shallow emotions
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4. Use of physical appearance to draw attention to self
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5. Impressionistic speech pattern
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6. Theatricality, exaggerated emotions
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7. Suggestible, ie easily influenced by others
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8. Regards relationships as more intimate than they are
Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed, Washington, DC, Am Psychiatric Assn, 1994  
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his·tri·on·ic per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(histrē-onik pĕrsŏ-nali-tē dis-ōrdĕr)
In adults, a pattern of excessive emotional expression and attention-seeking behavior coupled with an extreme need for approval and inappropriate seductive behavior.

histrionic personality disorder

A type of hysterical personality disorder manifested by ostentatious, flamboyant dress, exaggerated speech and manner, and theatrical, attention-seeking, behaviour. The conduct appears calculated to impress or shock. There is often inability to maintain deep relationships and psychosexual disorder is common.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present research findings indicated that greater level of childhood emotional abuse may risk developing histrionic personality disorder.
Results of the current study showed that narcissistic personality trait was the most common personality trait (34.5%) followed by histrionic personality trait, and obsessive personality trait was the least common (4%) among patients seeking BoNTA injection (Figure.
Histrionic personality disorder###3.66###1.54###0-7###0.10###(0.72)###0.35**###0.47**###0.25*
Adults who do not know this have what we now call (in psychology) narcissistic and/or histrionic personality disorders.
(7) This patient was also a young female and possibly to have a histrionic personality disorder.
However, we should take a closer look at the dimensions of the items with the highest averages, Conscientiousness and Attention Seeking, contemplating attributes related to obsessive-compulsive disorder and histrionic disorder, once the literature presents data showing the difficulty in assessing the most pathological aspects of dimensions related to typical characteristics of obsessive-compulsive and histrionic personality functioning (Hopwood, Thomas, Markon, Wright, & Krueger, 2012; Widiger, 2011).
Chapters have been updated and those on research, clinical assessment, dependent personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, histrionic personality disorder, and antisocial personality disorder have been rewritten.
In any case, after the histrionic personality, the narcissistic one would be the style/disorder with the more positive and significant relationships with social skills.
For example, the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire Hysteria scale seems to be a measure of histrionic personality rather than Meehl and Hathaway's (1946) description of the hysterical temperament which Hystericality was intended to measure.
Depressive disorder was the most common one observed followed by histrionic personality disorder and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.
Meta-analysis participant demographic characteristics (n = 573) Characteristics % Axis I Conduct disorder (CD) 51% Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) 42% Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 54% Other secondary 28% Axis II beliefs Mixed 56% Borderline personality 38% Narcissistic personality 28% Histrionic personality 2% Dependent personality 30% Antisocial personality 20% Ethnicity/race African-American 52% Caucasian 43% Latin 4% Other 1% Ages 14 10% 15 18% 16 42% 17 30% Background Experienced abuse: sexual, physical, verbal and/ 90% or neglect Witnessed violence 56% Parasuicidal 24% Recidivism (two years post-treatment) General recidivism < 7% Sexual reoffending < 4% Source: Apsche, Bass, & DiMeo (2010) Table 2.
Although the mean of syndrome scores for the patients with an maladaptive personality was higher than suicide attempters via overdose medicine use, just the four criteria, that is, severe major depression clinical syndrome, histrionic personality disorder, anxiety clinical syndrome, and depressive clinical personality, were the discriminators of the patients who were hospitalized for medicine poisoning and those who committed suicide via overdose medicine use.