histopathology

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histology

 [his-tol´o-je]
that department of anatomy dealing with the minute structure, composition, and function of tissues. adj., adj histolog´ic, histolog´ical.
pathologic histology the science of diseased tissues.

his·to·pa·thol·o·gy

(his'tō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē),
The science or study dealing with the cytologic and histologic structure of abnormal or diseased tissue.

histopathology

(hĭs′tō-pə-thŏl′ə-jē, -pă-)
n.
The study of the microscopic anatomical changes in diseased tissue.

his′to·path′o·log′ic (-păth′ə-lŏj′ĭk), his′to·path′o·log′i·cal adj.
his′to·path′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
his′to·pa·thol′o·gist n.

histopathology

[his′tōpəthol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, histos, tissue, pathos, disease, logos, science
the study of diseases involving the tissue cells.

histopathology

The hospital-based specialty which renders diagnoses based on tissues removed during various operative interventions and procedures—e.g., endoscopy, biopsy, resections. British histopathologists have trained for over five years as specialist registrars, are on the GMC’s specialist register and are fellows of the Royal College of Pathologists.

histopathology

Anatomic pathology, tissue pathology The field that studies diseased tissue by microscopic examination of tissues

his·to·pa·thol·o·gy

(his'tō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
The science or study dealing with the cytologic and histologic structure of abnormal or diseased tissue.

histopathology

The microscopic study of disease processes in tissues.

Histopathology

The study of diseased tissues at a minute (microscopic) level.
Mentioned in: Prostate Cancer

histopathology (hisˈ·tō·p·thäˑ·l·jē),

n the study of diseased tissue, with a focus on changes that are anatomically microscopic.

his·to·pa·thol·o·gy

(his'tō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
The science or study dealing with the cytologic and histologic structure of abnormal or diseased tissue.

histopathology (his´tōpəthol´əjē),

n the microscopic study of abnormal tissue and organs at the cellular level.

histopathology

pathological histology.
References in periodicals archive ?
MRI findings and histopathologic results of breast lesions biopsied by MRI-guided VABB between 2013 and 2016 were retrospectively analyzed.
The morphologic domain comprises features from 3 categories: (1) high-resolution computed tomography imaging patterns commonly found in patients with CTD-ILD, such as those with NSIP, organizing pneumonia, NSIP with organizing pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia; (2) histopathologic findings in an SLB that are highly associated with the presence of CTD, such as an NSIP pattern, organizing pneumonia pattern, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia pattern, the presence of interstitial lymphoid aggregates with germinal centers, and diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with or without lymphoid follicles; and (3) multicompartment involvement, which includes additional features evident on diagnostic imaging, histopathology, cardiac catheterization, or pulmonary function testing.
Conclusion: Chronic cholecystitis was the commonest histopathologic finding in this study.
A total of 630 cases that were submitted for routine histopathologic investigations were considered for this study.
The present paper describes macroscopic, radiographic and histopathologic findings of nasal granuloma in two Gir cattle.
For both newborns, significant histopathologic changes were limited to the brain, and included parenchymal calcification, microglial nodules, gliosis, and cell degeneration and necrosis.
Histopathologic examination of a skin biopsy confirmed in-transit metastatic melanoma with atypical melanocytes present in superficial dermal lymphatics, Dr.
Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency and age-specific incidence rate of different histopathologic subtypes of breast cancer in Iran and compare it to neighboring and Western countries and to discuss the probable effective main factors.
Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen revealed multiple granulomas surrounded by chronic inflammatory cells and central necrosis.
Using unilateral laparoscopic or open renal artery clamping for various time durations in a porcine model, the authors suggested that no permanent renal histopathologic damage occurred with up to 60 minutes of WIT in the clamped kidney.
Cerqueira and Fernandes (2002) pointed out moreover that because the gills are the principal site for gas exchange and other important functions such as ionic and osmotic regulation in addition to acid-base balance, histopathologic changes in the structure of these organs involve respiratory disturbances and electrolyte imbalance.
These melanoma field cells are morphologically normal junctional melanocytes and thus cannot be identified using histopathologic criteria.