hispid


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Related to hispid: hispid pocket mouse

hispid

(hĭs′pĭd)
adj.
Covered with stiff or rough hairs; bristly: hispid stems.

his·pid′i·ty (hĭ-spĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

hispid

(of plant tissues) possessing coarse, stiff hairs.
References in periodicals archive ?
cedecei abundance, reservoir (hispid cotton rat plus cotton mouse) host use, or proportion of blood meals from reservoir hosts ([chi square] = 4.08, df = 3; p = 0.252).
Nisoscolopocerus can be distinguished by having antennal segment I longer than total length of head, abdomen oval in outline, connexivum strongly exposed beyond margin of corium, and general surface of the body clothed with hispid tubercles.
Distribution and ecology of the hispid and least cotton rats in New Mexico.
Although new distributional records for these species are not presented in this paper, the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) and hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) also have advanced northward into the state in recent decades.
We caught one southern flying squirrel in eastern redcedar forest whereas we caught fulvous harvest mice, hispid cotton rats, and least shrews (Cryptotis parva) exclusively in unforested habitats.
Results--In 3,777 trap nights we captured 311 small mammals of five species (Table 1), listed in decreasing order of abundance: hispid cotton rat (S.
Climbing Activity in Hispid Cotton Rat, Sigmodon hispidus, and the Easter Meadow Vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus.
elator (2) at the ungrazed site concurs with Packard & Roberts (1973) observation that the Texas kangaroo rat and hispid cotton rat rarely co-occur.
Fruits 1.5-2.0 cm long, hispid, imbricate, deflexed, dehiscent, oblong, straight, turgid.
Experimentally induced habitat shifts by hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus): Response to protein supplementation.
The main prey was the hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus), which represented 83.6% of total individuals, followed by the Peter's climbing rat (Tylomys nudicaudus) with 7.1%.
Also, the perigynia of bog plants are, in general, longer and narrower than those of grassland plants; additionally, the perigynia of the former are smooth except sometimes sparingly hispidulous just beneath the beak, whereas those of the latter are distinctly appressed hispid above the middle of the perigynium.