high-tech medicine


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high-tech med·i·cine

(hī-tek med'i-sin)
Colloquial and imprecise term for therapy related to use of advanced modalities.

high-tech medicine

Engineered advances in medical knowledge and technique that have resulted in improved diagnostic, therapeutic, and rehabilitative procedures.
See also: medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
High-touch medicine will join high-tech medicine as East meets West.
The Future of People section notes many startling prospects for high-tech medicine, including artificial replacements for most human body parts (many available within the next 20 years), and many new techniques for extending life and enhancing physical and mental abilities starting even before birth.
Does this mean that our high-tech medicine no longer requires postmortem exams to verify the cause of death?
The hospital is to pioneer new bedless treatment centres, called ambulatory care centres, which will combine high-tech medicine and organisation.
A sympathetic bedside manner may seem inconsistent with today's high-tech medicine, but a doctor who is able to empathize with your fears, frustrations, anger, and loss -- and provide comfort and encouragement -- never goes out of style.
Our society's bias toward high-tech medicine caused us to approve bypass surgery quickly, and wait decades before giving equal funding to less costly, safer alternatives.
A problem frequently encountered with high-tech medicine is that of taking the mountain to Mohammed.
Along similar lines, Eli Ginzberg acknowledges the contribution of "high-tech medicine" to spending, but he claims that it is desired by the public and that there is no low-tech option.(13) Furthermore, he suggests that although our emphasis on technology assessment and outcomes analysis can improve the quality of care, it is unlikely to have much impact on total health care spending because "the costs of expanding desirable services that are found to be underutilized are likely to exceed the savings from the elimination of unnecessary procedures."