high-risk pool

high-risk pool

Health insurance A group of persons who have been denied health insurance by insurers, because of a medical Hx that may include CA, heart disease, emphysema, etc, placing them at high risk for future claims and medical costs
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Nephrologists indicated the high-risk pool of patients to be twice as large as radiologists (32percent vs.
Kamp added that while the lawsuit only addresses the constitutionality of whether the department was properly authorized by the Legislature to implement a plan, insurers have clearly slated they do not think the current department plan will solve critical problems in the high-risk pool without seriously damaging the entire insurance marketplace.
Murphy's office rolled out several state-level health care laws mirroring the Affordable Care Act, such as the health insurance mandate and a high-risk pool, funded by fines for not having health insurance.
The legislation allows states to apply for waivers that would allow insurers to charge people with pre-existing conditions more if the state sets up a high-risk pool or participates in a federal risk-sharing program.
In Maryland's proposed program, Kaiser worries that most of those fund could go towards a high-risk pool of people, such asthose covered by CareFirst's PPO product.<br />If that happens, Kaiser would not receive much of a benefit from the reinsurance pool and could consider raising rates further to compensate, Horn said.
While Alaska used money left over from its high-risk pool that existed before the ACA, Louisiana's high-risk surplus was spent under Gov.
"If you force me into a high-risk pool, you will either bankrupt me or kill me," she said.
Further, this proposal would act to transform the existing ACA market into a high-risk pool by siphoning off consumers with lower health risks into skimpy plans.
Even if the Republican plan replaced Obamacare, and even if the infant didn't have employer-provided insurance, the treatment would still be covered, either through a traditional plan or a high-risk pool. And at the end of the day, a federal law, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, guarantees this kind of treatment, whether we have Obamacare or Trumpcare.
While the AHCA would keep in place the prohibition against denying coverage due to preexisting conditions, states could apply for waivers that will let insurance carriers charge more to new policyholders with existing medical conditions if the state participates in a high-risk pool. One of the last-minute "deals" that helped push the AHCA across the finish line in the House was the leadership's agreement to add another $8 billion to help fund state high-risk pools.
The vote came after last-minute arm twisting, with moderates appeased by an $8 billion amendment for a high-risk pool to help patients with existing conditions pay for higher premiums and out-of-pocket costs.
Especially controversial is a provision that lets states essentially allow insurers to charge more for people with pre-existing conditions by putting them in a high-risk pool. About one-quarter to one-half of adults in the U.S.