high-impact sport

high-impact sport

Sports medicine An activity or sport charaterized by intense and/or frequent wear and trauma of weight-bearing joints–foot, knee and hip Examples HIS Baseball, basketball, football, handball, hockey, karate, racquetball, running, soccer, waterskiing; participation in HISs is discouraged after hip and knee arthroplasty. Cf Low-impact sport, Moderate impact sport, No-impact sport.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's no fitness benefit to playing a high-impact sport such as rugby in schools.
Running is a high-impact sport, and every time your feet hit the floor your joints take a force that is three times your body weight, so unless you have really soft cushioned feet, the repeated action of running can lead to joint problems.
Two-thirds of the patients who had been symptomatic for 12 months or less before microfracture were able to return to their high-impact sport, compared with just 14% who had been symptomatic for more than a year before the procedure.
If there is a weakness in the bone and you are playing a high-impact sport then you are running the risk of breaking it again.
If you play baseball, hockey, lacrosse or another high-impact sport, ask your coach if there is an AED at your games.
That high-impact sport became hard on his knees, so he turned to the NordicTrack machine three or four times a week.
Her answer is precise and emphatic: "Skiing isn't a high-impact sport if done correctly.
This hormone allows your muscles and tendons to stretch, which is obviously useful for giving birth but not for a high-impact sport like the 400m.
Djokovic said there was no doubt about the Argentine's quality, but his biggest problem was his sheer size and staying injury-free in their high-impact sport.
For example, running is considered a high-impact sport and as such, results in a lot of repetitive pounding of the ankle, knee, and hip joints.