high-frequency hearing loss


Also found in: Acronyms.

high-frequency hearing loss

Etymology: ME, heigh + L, frequens; AS, deaf
a loss of ability to hear high-frequency sounds. It is most commonly associated with aging or noise exposure. Hearing loss may begin in early adulthood with a loss of hearing to frequencies in the range of 18 to 20 kHz. At about 60 years of age, loss of hearing may begin to affect lower frequencies, in the range of 4 to 8 kHz, thus interfering with the ability to understand speech. Hearing loss caused by noise exposure is often greatest at or near 4 kHz.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensorineural high-frequency hearing loss after drill-generated acoustic trauma in tympanoplasty.
2]; blood cadmium levels were higher in adolescents with high-frequency hearing loss and lower household income and in adolescent smokers.
The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders estimates that 15% of Americans (26m people) between the ages of 20 and 69 have high-frequency hearing loss due to exposure to noise at work or during leisure activities.
The workers' adjusted high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL), and prevalence was defined as one or more hearing levels at 3, 4, or 6 kHz in either ear equal to or higher than 25 dB.
The iPhone uHear application is therefore an appropriate tool to screen for disabling hearing loss, and to detect high-frequency hearing loss in the abovementioned high-risk groups in poorly resourced communities that have limited access to healthcare.
Pure tone thresholds fell within the range shown in Figure 1, which describes a severe-to-profound high-frequency hearing loss for the higher frequencies.
High-frequency hearing loss affects millions of people as they age and can also be caused by disease, injury, exposure to excessive noise, or medication with adverse side effects.
Doctors termed it a high-frequency hearing loss in both ears that troubles him in crowds.
Doctors said it was a high-frequency hearing loss in both ears, troubling him in crowded rooms.
It is usually one of the first signs of high-frequency hearing loss.
All had normal hearing as verified audiometrically (American National Standards Institute, 1969) and were screened to ensure that they had no abnormal high-frequency hearing loss.
In contrast, humans at age 75 may have lost as many as 50 percent of the sensory cells in their ears (the outer hair cells) and have a high-frequency hearing loss.

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