high-altitude cerebral edema


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high-altitude cerebral edema

A syndrome attributed to vasogenic cerebral edema Clinical Headaches, nausea, disorientation, impaired cognitive function, death Management Transport Pt to a lower altitude. See Mountain sickness.
References in periodicals archive ?
High-altitude cerebral edema evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging: clinical correlation and pathophysiology.
McCormick, "High-altitude cerebral edema evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging.
A The higher you climb, the less oxygen that's available for you to breathe and the greater the risk you'll develop high-altitude illness, which includes acute mountain sickness and the more serious high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema.
Schaaf had died due to high-altitude cerebral edema, the Daily Express reports.
High-altitude illness refers to acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).
Furthermore, if you are unable to properly acclimatize to the thin mountain air, there is the risk for acute mountain sickness or the potentially fatal high-altitude pulmonary edema and high-altitude cerebral edema.
High-altitude pulmonary edema and high-altitude cerebral edema are potentially fatal conditions.
Hackett, who has seen the data and said he knows and respects the investigators, called the findings "really shocking." It has long been known that dexamethasone prevents the often severe headaches of acute mountain sickness as well as high-altitude cerebral edema, and in addition is a useful therapy for these conditions.
High-Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) occurs when the brain swells severely.
The most common of these illnesses, which can present as low as 2,000 m, is AMS which is usually self-limited but can progress to the more severe and potentially fatal entities of high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema11.
Acute mountain sickness, with symptoms such as headaches and vomiting, can easily develop into the much more serious high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or pulmonary edema (HAPE).
A The higher you climb, the less oxygen that's available for you to breathe and the greater the risk that you'll develop high-altitude illness, which includes acute mountain sickness (AMS) and the more serious high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema.

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