hierarchy

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hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ar-kē, hī-rar'kē),
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. In psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(hī′ə-rär′kē, hī′rär′-)
n. pl. hierar·chies
1. A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above: a career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.
2. Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades: classification by hierarchy; discounting the effects of hierarchy.
3. A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. psychology/psychiatry An organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(in CLASSIFICATION) the system of ranking in a graded order from species to kingdom. see HIGHER CATEGORY.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]
References in periodicals archive ?
Combining an iconoclastic parody of the Christian tale of resurrection and the grotesque notion of symbolic rebirth, this imagery utilizes anality and various references to the "lower bodily stratum" to invoke a critique of the limits of corporeality and the Western masculinist traditions which inflect them with hierarchised and binarised power relations.
instead of being subjected to pulsed, stratified and hierarchised
For Freeman, 'the interaction between the reason and the imagination in the sublime is itself an allegory of gender relations within patriarchy.' (32) Her insight might usefully be appropriated and applied to De Quincey's scenario, where it is the reverse which conceivably occurs: the 'poor vanquished imagination' sinks 'powerless before the fascinating rattlesnake eye of the murderer', and misogynistic gender relations (the pairing of the powerful with the putatively weak) constitute an allegory of the hierarchised binary-couplets in the sublime.
Georgescu-Roegen, like Roy, believed that hierarchised needs ruled consumer choice, and that needs of different orders were irreducible.3 The nice thing about Roy's paper is that it is a simple introduction to the intricate notion of hierarchy, with separability and subordination of needs.
This 'ownership', however, can be further hierarchised into primary and secondary categories (cf.
The ethnic and national categories later became rigidified, when Stalin simplified the map of ethno-cultural diversity and hierarchised the ethnic and national groups, giving each a different politico-administrative status.