hidebound


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hidebound: raillery

hidebound

(hīd′bound′)
adj.
Having abnormally dry, stiff skin that adheres closely to the underlying flesh. Used of domestic animals such as cattle.

hidebound

said of skin that is not easily lifted from the subcutaneous tissue. Occurs in emaciated animals because of the absence of fat and connective tissue rather than absence of fluid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, "conservative" media commentators should have challenged the media caricature of Strom Thurmond as a hidebound bigot.
Now he's also proved that their's nothing hidebound about Heidi.
More so than you might think Virtual trading systems built from scratch in the '80s means the financial world in Latin America already travels in bits and bytes, far more than the old-fashioned handfilled orders of hidebound Wall Street.
Mr Blair believes politicians have been hidebound by a belief that the British people are inherently anti-European, which is not necessarily the case, said his spokesman.
Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi said Monday he can carry out painful structural reforms in Japan's long-stagnant economy and hidebound political sphere as long as he can keep his approval ratings above 40%.
Despite its long history, Bartell Drug is neither hidebound nor resistant to change.
Not that the farmers of Braunschweig-Wolfenbuttel were hidebound traditionalists.
HIDEBOUND laid claim to being the best recruit seen so far this season when maintaining his unbeaten record with a hugely impressive performance in the Mitie Group Kennel Gate Novices' Hurdle at Ascot.
Hidebound laid claim to being the best recruit seen so far this season when maintaining his unbeaten record with an impressive performance in the Mitie Group Kennel Gate Novices' Hurdle.
It challenges the idea of Neandertals as hidebound simpletons less adaptable than modern humans.
While ostensibly accepting a variety of nontraditional assignments its core believers consider extraneous and burdensome--peacekeeping, humanitarian assistance, and the like--and zealously trumpeting itself as the revolutionary vanguard for a new age of third-wave, fourth-generation cyberwar, the military has remained stubbornly wedded to a hidebound conception of war and self.
Its movement vocabulary is hidebound with tradition, and its depiction of a contemporary woman's anger is wearyingly superficial.