hibernoma

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hibernoma

 [hi″ber-no´mah]
a rare benign tumor made up of large polyhedral cells with a coarsely granular cytoplasm, occurring on the back or around the hips.

hi·ber·no·ma

(hī'bĕr-nō'mă),
A rare type of benign neoplasm in humans, consisting of brown fat that resembles the fat in certain hibernating animals; individual tumor cells contain multiple lipid droplets.
See also: brown fat.
[L. hibernus, pertaining to winter, + G. -ōma, tumor]

hibernoma

/hi·ber·no·ma/ (-no´mah) a rare, benign, soft tissue tumor arising from vestiges of brown fat resembling that in certain hibernating animal species; it is a small, lobulated, nontender lesion usually occurring on the mediastinum or intrascapular region.

hibernoma

[hī′bərnō′mə] pl. hibernomas, hibernomata
Etymology: L, hibernus, winter; Gk, oma, tumor
a benign tumor, usually on the hips or the back, composed of fat cells that are partly or entirely of fetal origin. Also called fat cell lipoma, fetal lipoma.

hi·ber·no·ma

(hī'bĕr-nō'mă)
A rare benign neoplasm consisting of brown fat that resembles the fat in hibernating animals.
[L. hibernus, pertaining to winter, + G. -ōma, tumor]

hibernoma

a rare benign subcutaneous tumor made up of large foamy polyhedral cells distended with multiple lipoid-filled vacuoles. A fetal fat cell lipoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to their classic histomorphologic features, most hibernomas can readily be diagnosed without the use of ancillary studies.
Hibernomas are rare, benign, and slow growing and are often asymptomatic incidental findings on imaging or physical exam [2, 3].
Since these tumors are hypothesized to arise from tiny remnants of fetal brown fat, it is logical that common sites for hibernomas are areas known to contain brown fat in adults [1, 3].
Existe ademas un Hibernoma de tipo mixto que presenta grasa parda, tejido adiposo maduro y zonas intermedias entre ambas, donde se describen celulas que presentan un pigmento pardo granular, tipo lipofucsina, estos Hibernomas son mucho mas frecuentes que los puros, constituidos exclusivamente por grasa parda (12).
El Hibernoma o lipoma de grasa parda, descrito originalmente en 1906 por Merkel (1), es un tumor benigno extremadamente infrecuente, nombrado primeramente como Pseudolipoma.
Hibernomas can occur in any place where the brown fat remains like our case of a 47 years old man with a large soft tissue mass in the posterior triangle of the neck which was slowly and painlessly growing, while the patient was asymptomatic.
Hibernoma is a rare benign tumour arising from remnants of fetal brown adipose tissue.
On gross examination, hibernomas are soft to rubbery, encapsulated, yellow-brown macrolobulated masses.
Hibernomas manifest radiographically as radiolucent masses with an absence of calcification, osseous, or chondroid matrix and lacking associated aggressive osseous pathology, (14) as illustrated by our first case.
Hibernomas are seen mainly in adults, with a peak incidence during the third decade of life.
Hibernomas arising in extramammary sites are usually radiolucent in contrast to the adjacent muscle; however, in fatty breast tissue, this mass is relatively radiodense.
The differential diagnosis includes other primary soft tissue neoplasms, such as rhabdomyoma, hibernoma, clear cell sarcoma of soft tissue, perivascular epithelioid cell neoplasm (PEComa), paraganglioma, and granular cell tumor.