heuristic

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heuristic

 [hu-ris´tik]
1. encouraging or promoting investigation; conducive to discovery.
2. denoting a strategy for learning in which the student uses a tool or device for finding a way to achieve a goal or solve a problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
(49) By contrast, Justice Thomas would have heuristically ignored any empathic narratives entirely and dismissed the case against the school officials based on the common law doctrine of in loco parentis.
Attempts to recover some sense of the historical context of and the specific problems animating established texts and traditions, or to rethink lines of thought they suggest, remain heuristically valuable clues for reconceptualizing politics.
Von der Horst's analysis acknowledges the problem of mapping "Close to the Edge" according to the conventional features of sonata form, and he turns to "a feminist account of sonata form heuristically to tease out a violent, if confused, logic of identity at work in the song" (p.
Specifically, a driver is assumed to heuristically estimate a probabilistic travel time as simply a point inside the given range.
More troubling, I believe, is the way in which Lewis explains certain situations heuristically. Concepts such as "agglomeration economies," "economies of scale and scope," "inter-firm linkages," "high volume production," and "division of labour" are regularly invoked without empirical evidence to explain the spatial dynamics of manufacturing.
In exercising a new avenue for investigation, this author demonstrates heuristically how the novelist's work is as fiercely relevant today as a century ago when most of his works were composed.
Romm can be categorized (heuristically of course) as a critical systemic thinker, in that she `sweeps in' (as per Singer and Churchman in Ulrich, 2001, p.
Science thus needed processuality--but heuristically it kept its object-oriented approach from parts down to observables that are thought of as separable attributes.
Under what other discipline can any topic be treated so heuristically? What other field so adequately qualifies us to enter into discourse with so many other disciplines?
Most of Singal's readings are inevitably reduced by the heuristically unsatisfying dichotomy between Faulkner's Victorianism and his Modernism.
The concept of BBR is heuristically valuable to the field of curriculum development for young children with autism since it surpasses the three-term and four-term contingency and incorporates the existing repertoire of the child as an independent variable in the skill building process.
The isosyllabic/group-final-accent doctrine proves heuristically barren in Gouvard's discussion of metre in Chapter 3.