heterotrophy


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Related to heterotrophy: heterotroph

het·er·ot·ro·phy

(het'ĕr-ōt'rō-fē),
The ability or requirement to synthesize all metabolites from organic compounds.

het·er·ot·ro·phy

(het'ĕr-ot'rŏ-fē)
The ability or requirement to synthesize all metabolites from organic compounds.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1989), so heterotrophy is likely to be the rule, rather than the exception, in temperate freshwater plankton communities.
Indeed, we speculated in our initial studies of Tomales Bay that the heterotrophy was supported by marine input of organic matter (Smith et al.
In the laboratory, animals are sustained photoautotrophically for months with no additional input of nutrients via heterotrophy.
The effect of light and heterotrophy on carotenoid concentrations in the Caribbean anemone Aiptasia pallida (Verril).
Coral nutrition involves host heterotrophy and symbiont autotrophy.
In addition, if zooxanthellae do contribute substantially to the C budget of the host sponge, we hypothesize that this contribution is also influenced by the habitat in which the sponge lives, as the reduced light levels and the reduced zooxanthella concentrations (Hill, 1999) of deeper locations force the host sponges to rely more heavily on heterotrophy.
Key words: Dictyostega, Burmanniaceae, root structures, rhizome structures, atbuscular mycorrhiza, myco- heterotrophy.
According to Chandler and Anderson (1976), Drosera that were fed prey in a darkened room showed little growth, implying a negligible role for carbon heterotrophy.
For the temperate Anthopleura elegantissima, either the photosynthetic contributions are not retained by the anemones (lost as gametes, dissolved and particulate organic carbon), or translocated carbon composes a relatively small portion of the host anemone's diet, with the host deriving most of its nutrition via heterotrophy.
For example, these algae may be predisposed to heterotrophy and low light conditions and able to survive long periods in the dark, and their free-living forms may differ in their growth and morphology.