heterotopia

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heterotopia

 [het″er-o-to´pe-ah]
displacement or misplacement of parts. adj., adj heterotop´ic.

het·er·o·to·pi·a

(het'ĕr-ō-tō'pē-ă),
1. Synonym(s): ectopia
2. In neuropathology, displacement of gray matter, typically into the deep cerebral white matter.
[hetero- + G. topos, place]

het·er·o·to·pi·a

(het'ĕr-ō-tō'pē-ă)
1. Synonym(s): ectopia.
2. neuropathology Displacement of gray matter, typically into the deep cerebral white matter.
[hetero- + G. topos, place]
References in periodicals archive ?
Glial heterotopy is defined as the congenital abnormal location of mature glial tissue in an area outside the central nervous system without intercranial extension.
In his article, Foucault defined his concept of "heterotopy"; however, before doing so, he began the text with a diagnosis that graphically characterizes the spatial nature of the contemporary era: "The present epoch will perhaps be above all the epoch of space.
We leave you with this thought: what might be revealed using RNA interference in terms of heterotopy with regard to adaptive evolutionary change?
He had first discussed heterotopy in his influential volume Everyday Life in the Modern World, written in 1967 and published early in 1968; in this context, Lefebvre used the word as a derivative not of utopia but of the term isotopy, which had been coined by linguists not long before.
Second, heterochrony (a deviation from the typical embryological sequence of formation of organs and parts as a factor in evolution) and heterotopy (a displacement in or difference of position of an organ from the normal position) as specific forms of macromutations indicate the possible effects of viable deviations during development on the timing and the positioning of organelles and the structure of organisms.
(13,14) For instance, the great extent to which changes in plant form have been engendered was by heterochrony (temporal shifts in developmental pathways) or heterotopy (spatial shifts in developmental pathways).
For example, many of the changes in plant forms have been engendered by heterochrony (temporal shifts in developmental pathways) or heterotopy (spatial shifts in developmental pathways).
The vestigial representation of space embedded in law that articulates the monastery as a heterotopy has less force, then, than the vigorous, ongoing enforcement of customary spatial practices.
Changes in timing and place of gene action (heterochrony and heterotopy) are considered to be fundamental ways of altering adult phenotypes in relatively short periods of time (Alberch et al.
Although the presence of this posterior coelom in several planktotrophic asteroid larvae is suggested to result from heterotopy, similar to that described for the 'mesogen' of Pteraster tesselatus (Janies and McEdward, 1993), the original hypothesis - that it is a rudiment of a posterior coelom present in a common enteropneust-echinoderm ancestor - remains an alternative view (Gemmill, 1914; Byrne and Barker, 1991).
Confronted with this limit, they wondered whether the unnamed island they were seeking might actually be the boat, a place without place, a perfect heterotopy.