heterosexual


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heterosexual

 [het″er-o-sek´shoo-al]
1. pertaining to, characteristic of, or directed toward the opposite sex.
2. a person with erotic interests directed toward the opposite sex.
3. contrasexual (def. 1).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

het·er·o·sex·u·al

(het'ĕr-ō-seks'yū-ăl),
1. A person whose sexual orientation is toward people of the opposite sex.
2. Relating to or characteristic of heterosexuality.
3. One whose interests and behavior are characteristic of heterosexuality.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

heterosexual

adjective Referring to heterosexuality; not gay, straight.
 
noun A person who is heterosexually oriented or prefers the opposite sex.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

heterosexual

Psychology adjective Referring to heterosexuality  straight; not gay noun A person who is heterosexually oriented, or prefers the opposite sex. See Heterophilia. Cf Homosexual.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

het·er·o·sex·u·al

(het'ĕr-ō-sek'shū-ăl)
1. A person whose sexual orientation is toward people of the opposite sex.
2. Relating to or characteristic of heterosexuality.
3. One whose interests and behavior are characteristic of heterosexuality.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

heterosexual

pertaining to the opposite sex, male as opposed to female, female as opposed to male.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

het·er·o·sex·u·al

(het'ĕr-ō-sek'shū-ăl)
1. A person whose sexual orientation is toward people of the opposite sex.
2. Relating to or characteristic of heterosexuality.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Considero de gran fuerza subversiva las propuestas de Wittig de nuevas formas de lenguaje para nombrar aquello que aun no tiene nombre en el marco social heterosexual y de nuevas formas de comunidades de afectos que aun no se han visto en la sociedad binaria heterosexual.
Childhood sexual abuse was more frequent among bisexual women (43.5%), lesbians (38.1%), and heterosexuals with same-sex partners (28%) than among heterosexual women with no same-sex partners (14.2%).
Yet Medicaid and Social Security do not recognize same-sex partners, so they can't count on those federal safety nets in the same way that heterosexuals do if they face financial hardships.
However, there is some evidence of differences in olfactory preferences between heterosexual men and women and gay men and lesbians (Martins et al., 2005).
Some scholars suggest that endorsement of traditional gender-roles reflects a motivation to maintain traditional gender-role distinctions and unambiguous category boundaries (e.g., Bosson, Prewitt-Freilino, & Taylor, 2005; Whitley, 2002), but homosexuals challenge this differentiation since they are perceived as similar to the opposite sex heterosexual (Kite & Deaux, 1987).
The words "heterosexual" and "homosexual" traveled from Germany to the U.S.
The authors showed that connectivity to the subgenual cortex and the hypothalamus is similar in heterosexual women and homosexual men, and connectivity to the sensorimotor cortex and striatum is similar in homosexual women and heterosexual men.
"Although members of gay and lesbian couples do not divide household labor in a perfectly equal manner, they are more likely than members of heterosexual couples to negotiate a balance between achieving a fair distribution of household labor and accommodating the different interests, skills, and work schedules of particular partners," Kurdek notes.
"And we may presume that God will continue to call both homosexuals and heterosexuals to the priesthood because the Church needs the gift of both."
How and when does one choose to become heterosexual?
To explore this aspect of risk, researchers studied how heterosexual men (157 participants), heterosexual women (177), and MSM (106) aged 18-25 years, recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk system (a crowdsourcing marketplace) and a university in Canada, make decisions about using condoms.
Worthen confirms a clear "sexuality gap" between exclusive heterosexuals and all others as well as gender gaps among mostly heterosexual and lesbian, gay and bisexual students, though some gaps are in the opposite direction from the results expected.