heterosexism


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The belief that heterosexual activities and institutions are better than those with a genderless or homosexual orientation

heterosexism

Psychology The belief that heterosexual activities and institutions are better than those with a genderless or homosexual orientation. See Homophobia.

het·er·o·sex·ism

(het'ĕr-ō-sek'sizm)
A belief that heterosexuality is the only normal and acceptable sexual orientation and is superior to other orientations. Heterosexism discriminates against and excludes people on the basis of sexual orientation.
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Therefore, counselors may use RCT tenets to develop a sound multicultural and social justice conceptualization of the heterosexism experiences that LGBTQQ people have and the oppression they may have internalized (Frey, 2013).
Organizations may assist the LGBT population through mechanisms that encourage voice, minimize heterosexism and invisibility, and combat the effects captured by Schneider's ASA theory.
2004), including anti-LGBTQ bias, homoprejudice and heterosexism (Phillips, 2000); (b) exploration of early childhood messages about LGBTQ individuals and challenge of those negative beliefs and/or biases (Pearson, 2003); and (c) acknowledgment and discussion of benefits and challenges to the coming out process (Callahan, 2001).
This institutionalized discrimination is a not so subtle form of heterosexism.
Higher levels of organizational heterosexism and the presence of perceived workplace discrimination will reduce the likelihood of gay men and lesbians disclosing their sexual orientations (Ragins & Cornwell, 2001) to other gay men and lesbians as well as heterosexuals (Wood, 1994).
Heterosexism is viewed as another "social prejudice, such as racism or sexism.
We must seek to occupy the intersections of multiple oppressions, including heterosexism, racism and cissexism.
This research extends earlier work conducted in 1992 in the United States about faculty support for content on diverse populations and types of oppression, including content addressing gay men, lesbians, homophobia, and heterosexism (Gutierrez, Fredriksen, & Soifer, 1999).
For example, the way the Chicana feminist movement developed asa response to rampant heterosexism in the Chicano movement and the exclusion of women of color from early U.
racism, sexism, and heterosexism through the "chivalric"
Furthermore, stigmatization salience and organizational climate for heterosexism predict levels of workplace outness.