heteronomous

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heteronomous

 [het″er-on´ŏ-mus]
subject to different laws; in biology, subject to different laws of growth or specialized along different lines.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

het·er·on·o·mous

(het'ĕr-on'ō-mŭs), Do not confuse this word with heteronymous.
1. Different from the type; abnormal.
2. Subject to the direction or control of another; not self-governing. Compare: autonomous.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

heteronomous

(hĕt′ə-rŏn′ə-məs)
adj.
1. Subject to external or foreign laws or domination; not autonomous.
2. Biology Differing in development or structure.

het′er·on′o·mous·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

het·er·on·o·mous

(het'ĕr-on'ŏ-mŭs)
1. Different from the particular type; abnormal.
2. Subject to the direction or control of another; not self-governing.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

het·er·on·o·mous

(het'ĕr-on'ŏ-mŭs)
1. Different from the type; abnormal.
2. Subject to direction or control of another.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(33.) It should be noted that whilst Castoriadis places discussions of power within the orbit of his distinction between heteronomy and autonomy, that is in the context of either the occluded or self-institution of power, the discussion here revolves around its form as a social relation irrespective of whether it is instituted heteronomously or autonomously.
Because through this, the I as a person becomes autonomous in relation to its mere wants, even if this occurs through a deeply, heteronomously felt, affective ground.
If you were to approach this book heteronomously, you could learn many useful rules.
Nor would Kant agree with Professor Dagger that "it is possible for an autonomous person to act in a thoroughly selfish manner." To act out of selfish motivations is, for Kant, to act heteronomously, not autonomously.
As a thesis about church teaching, the autonomy of moral reasoning helps protect the moral norm from being imposed heteronomously by any outside authority in general or the magisterium in particular.(39) The Church's teaching must be made plausible by dialogue and rational argument to all people of good will.
But it will be argued that a satisfactory account of this aim must also be conceived in light of a person's actual motivational capacities, especially those endemic to her heteronomously formed core traits.
This qualification does not imply that it is superfluous for her to raise the question of flourishing, but only that she must do so in terms of how she should actively modify the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral aspects of her heteronomously formed traits.
For these reasons, the question of the ideal traits on which our own flourishing depends is properly conceived as largely one of successfully modifying, at least within reason, aspects of our heteronomously formed core traits.
Rejecting Adorno's notion of artistic progress as a criterion of beauty, since it must perforce relate heteronomously to non-aesthetic normative discourses, Menke locates aesthetic autonomy in Adorno's revitalization of Hegel's notion of "Das Naturschone", whose irreducibly independent sensuousness suggests the suspension of understanding in aesthetic experience.
Even if those were magically liberated from whatever form of Foucaultian bio-power may heteronomously control them, they would still be in the grip of the Anthropocenic geo-power that frames their interplay, as they themselves exercise it.