heteronomous


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heteronomous

 [het″er-on´ŏ-mus]
subject to different laws; in biology, subject to different laws of growth or specialized along different lines.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

het·er·on·o·mous

(het'ĕr-on'ō-mŭs), Do not confuse this word with heteronymous.
1. Different from the type; abnormal.
2. Subject to the direction or control of another; not self-governing. Compare: autonomous.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

heteronomous

(hĕt′ə-rŏn′ə-məs)
adj.
1. Subject to external or foreign laws or domination; not autonomous.
2. Biology Differing in development or structure.

het′er·on′o·mous·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

het·er·on·o·mous

(het'ĕr-on'ŏ-mŭs)
1. Different from the particular type; abnormal.
2. Subject to the direction or control of another; not self-governing.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

het·er·on·o·mous

(het'ĕr-on'ŏ-mŭs)
1. Different from the type; abnormal.
2. Subject to direction or control of another.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to show the heteronomous origin of this command, which implies the possibility of reciprocal actions (the sacrifice of Isaac) S.
From the perspective of the primal psychic core that, urged by the pleasure principle, rejects the nature of reality, and resists the abandonment of omnipotence, sublimation would appear as a heteronomous rule or as an external principle, which imposes itself by force.
Michael's case reveals the conflict that exists between the responsibility for the other as a non-negotiable, non-transferable moral concern on the one hand and on the other, the adherence to ethical rules specified by heteronomous moral reasoning.
As such, younger heteronomous thinkers might view maternal reactions as always fair because they are more likely to conform their own behavior to adult expectations.
Brockman points out that Witz's sites represent a continuum from least control at the heteronomous end to greatest control at the autonomous end.
Taking into account Figure 3, the variables that were positive include "Lack of the sense of belonging, Hands-off policy, Dissatisfied organization, Unclear objective of the management, and Organization with no autonomous action" were considered that organization is "heteronomous".
Nonlogical science, as immediately undertaken, is doubly unfree, doubly heteronomous. It establishes neither what its subject matter should be nor what procedure it should employ.
In place of the transparency of accountability, Levinas substitutes the opacity of the Other, who is both unknowable in principle, and yet intimately proximate through the 'extreme sensitivity of one subjectivity to another, the heteronomous responsibility of our subjectivity' (cited in Campbell 1994, p.
True science as we understand it was born when the early Ionian philosophers established the principle that science must be autonomous in the sense that in the search for truth the conscience of the scholar is to be the ultimate authority, independent of the heteronomous authority of the worldly or ecclesiastical rulers.