heteromorphic


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

heteromorphic

(hĕt′ə-rō-môr′fĭk)
adj.
1. Having different forms at different periods of the life cycle, as in stages of insect metamorphosis.
2. Differing from the standard form in size or structure: heteromorphic chromosome pairs.

het′er·o·mor′phism n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

heteromorphic

  1. (of an organism) having morphologically different forms in the life history, for example, where there is ALTERNATION OF GENERATIONS.
  2. (of pairs of homologous chromosomes) differing in size or form.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The complement includes 10 bi-armed, 12 acrocentric pairs of autosomes and, occasionally, one heteromorphic (subtelocentric/acrocentric) large autosomal pair.
In Canscora roxburghii, corolla and androecium (heteromorphic anthers) are monosymmetric (Thiv & Kadereit, 2002b).
The structures were identified as heteromorphic deutonymphs of Hypodectes propus (Order Astigmata) of the family Hypoderatidae.
indica (Schumann, 1886; Scott, 1978; Verdoorn, 1981; Thulin, 1998) were: cymes heteromorphic, calyces unorderly, half (Scott, 1978) to none (Scott, 1978; Thulin, 1998) of the normal nearly completely fused stamen filament fusion lengths, a stipitate distended arcuate pistil, ovary abnormally shaped and stigma composite-nodular.
2010)] in males, and other own observation (in Sutton's slides) that some individuals carried a heteromorphic autosomal pair: thus, both homologues could be microscopically identified according to size (Carothers 1913).
First, when one sees a liverwort, hornwort, or moss in the field or elsewhere, the observed specimen, with only a very few exceptions, represents the gametophyte (1n) phase of the organism's heteromorphic alternation of phases (or generations).
Meiotic complements of the three analyzed species of the family Bothriuridae contain no heteromorphic chromosome pair, which indicates the absence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, as is also the case in Buthus occitanus (Amoreux 1789) and Pandinus imperator (C.L.
Aquatic or amphibious, stems creeping with adventitious roots from nodes and internodes; leaves heteromorphic (photosynthetic and fertile), petioles filiform, blades palmately divided into 4 pinnae; sporocarps horizontal to strongly ascending near base of petioles.
Definitive taxonomic identification of most damselfly species is based upon microscopic examination, particularly of genital anatomy, and the genus Ischnura is a notoriously difficult one since in many species females, and sometimes males, may be heterochromic and even heteromorphic (see Figs.