heterology


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het·er·ol·o·gy

(het'ĕr-ol'ŏ-jē),
A departure from the normal in structure, arrangement, or mode or time of development.

heterology

A term of waning use for an aberration in structure, organisation or timing of embryonic development; e.g., dysgenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The debate could be to clarify the elements that condition that agonism or that heterology. For example, the dispositions and habitus of agents or social groups (Bourdieu), the models or cultural repertoires activated and their situation with respect to institutions (Even-Zohar).
Taking issue with the frequently made distinction between the heteronomy often attributed to the individual in earlier periods and the autonomy attributed to the modern subject, she convincingly argues that early modern texts display 'heterology' (a theory she takes from Verena Olejniczak, 'Heterologie: Konturen fruhneuzeitlichen Selbstseins jenseits von Autonomie und Heteronomie', LiLi, 26 (1996), 6-36).
A Heterology of Classical Greek Slavery" Greece and Rome 40 (1993): 163-80, and Paul Cartledge, The Greeks: A Portrait of Self and Others (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), chap.
This heterology (in De Certeau's terminology), or multiplicity of knowledges of the city, was shaped by overlapping spatialities (between people's places of origin and the New York neighborhood) and temporalities (between past and present lives of individuals and groups).
Heterology expression of the Arabidopsis C-Repeat/Dehydration Response Element Binding Factor 1 gene confers elevated tolerance to chilling and oxidative stresses in transgenic tomato.
On this quasi-seesaw position, see Desan, 1992, who describes comparable effects in Montaigne's language, 111, 131: It is "un discours hybride" and hence a "heterology," a new semantic and ideological field." Desan recognizes that this heterology uniting as it does socio-economic with ethicopolitical language, is not unique to Montaigne but rather symptomatic of changes in late Renaissance culture.
Marchitello's own contribution, "Heterology and Post-Historicist Ethics," which attempts to retheorize the notion of space and its connection to time, is so dense and employs so many unconnected examples, that he quickly loses his audience.
However, I believe that Bataille's anti-Hegelianism and detailed discussions of transgression and heterology are particularly relevant for seeing Chopin's epistemology of subversiveness in The Awakening.
Benign dermal schwannoma with glandular elements: true heterology or a local organizer effect.
Branch migration through DNA sequence heterology. J Mol Biol 1998;279:795-806.
Wyschogrod, E., 1998, An Ethics of Remembering: History, Heterology, and the Nameless Others.
Wyschogrod's (1998) remarkable study, An Ethics of Remembering, focuses on the ethics of the treatment of the other (the past other) as the ethical core of the historian's work of "heterology." This serves to underscore one difference between history and memory, the latter always seeking absorption, unity, and identity.