heterologous

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heterologous

 [het″er-ol´o-gus]
1. made up of tissue not normal to the part.
3. possessing different alleles in regard to a given characteristic.

het·er·ol·o·gous

(het'ĕr-ol'ŏ-gŭs),
1. Pertaining to cytologic or histologic elements occurring where they are not normally found.
See also: xenogeneic.
2. Derived from an animal of a different species, as the serum of a horse is heterologous for a rabbit.
[hetero- + G. logos, ratio, relation]

heterologous

/het·er·ol·o·gous/ (het″er-ol´ah-gus)
1. made up of tissue not normal to the part.

heterologous

(hĕt′ə-rŏl′ə-gəs)
adj.
1.
a. Not corresponding or similar in position, value, structure, or function; not homologous.
b. Biology Relating to traits, such as organs or body parts, that do not correspond in structure or evolutionary origin.
2. Derived from a different species: a heterologous transplant; a heterologous gene.
3. Genetics Relating to chromosomes that do not normally pair during mitosis or meiosis.
4. Relating to cells or tissues that do not usually occur in a given part of the body: a heterologous tumor.
5. Immunology
a. Relating to a vaccine or serum that confers immunity against a pathogen that is not identical to but is immunologically related to the pathogen used to create the vaccine or serum.
b. Relating to an antigen and antibody that do not correspond to one another.

het′er·ol′o·gy (-jē) n.
het′er·ol′o·gous·ly adv.

heterologous

het·er·ol·o·gous

(het'ĕr-ol'ŏ-gŭs)
1. Pertaining to cytologic or histologic elements occurring where they are not normally found.
See also: xenogeneic
2. Derived from an animal of a different species; thus the serum of a horse is heterologous for a rabbit.
[hetero- + G. logos, ratio, relation]

heterologous

1. Derived from a different source.
2. Of a transfusion or transplant from a different species.
3. Of tissue not normally present at a particular site.
4. Of parts of different organisms that differ in structure.

heterologous

1. made up of tissue not normal to the part.
2. derived from an individual of a different species.
References in periodicals archive ?
For Certeau asking about the nature of the subject and the object is the same: heterologies.
For convenience I refer to this edition ('The Institution of Rot', in Heterologies, Discourse on the Other, op.
That distance is the alibi of ethnography and folklore (entrenched in Tylor's deceptive concept of "survivals"), whose object of study "can only be grasped in the process of vanishing" (Certeau, Heterologies 131).
Montaigne's `Of Cannibals': the Savage `I'", in his Heterologies, translated
Michel de Certeau, Heterologies Discourse on the Other, trans.