heteroeroticism


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heteroeroticism

 [het″er-o-ĕ-rot´ĭ-sizm]
1. sexual feeling directed toward another person, sometimes specifically one of the opposite sex.
2. alloeroticism (def. 1).
3. a stage in which the erotic energy is directed toward objects other than oneself, specifically to those of the opposite sex. adj. adj heteroerot´ic.

het·er·o·e·rot·i·cism

(het'ĕr-ō-ĕ-rot'ĭ-sism),
A condition of sexual excitement brought about by congress with a person of the opposite sex.

heteroeroticism

/het·ero·erot·i·cism/ (het″er-o-ĕ-rot´ĭ-sizm)
1. sexual feeling directed toward someone of the opposite sex.
3. a stage in which the erotic energy is directed toward objects other than oneself, specifically to those of the opposite sex.heteroerot´ic

heteroeroticism

[het′ərō·irot′isiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, heteros, different, eros, love
sexual feeling or activity directed toward another individual. Also called alloeroticism, alloerotism, heteroerotism. Compare autoeroticism.

heteroeroticism

Sexuoeroticism directed towards another person.
References in periodicals archive ?
two-dimensional model in which homoeroticism and heteroeroticism are
One point, however, is undeniable: Heteroeroticism is enabled by the poet-speaker's other man, a "he" whose intrusive but necessary presence remains at once distant and proximate to the "I.
Anatomized in this manner, her image breaks up--much like the icon of Love--into fragments, suggesting that male heteroeroticism can only undo what it desires.
This embarrassing performance clearly implies that his heteroeroticism remains an object of derision.
Each attempt to reject or reconcile Florence with any kind of sexuality falls flat at the point where it blindly and exclusively relies upon an undifferentiated heteroeroticism to explain whatever social or sexual powers Florence may or may not have.
The seemingly stable social classes of aristocracy, gentry, and peasantry, and the presumed 'natural' gender relations of heteroeroticism, are upheld by the 'perfection' of the central characters.
That the rubric "sexuality" appears only apropos the homoeroticism of Edward H problematically implies that the representation of heteroeroticism in other plays is a matter of gender, not sexuality.