heterocyclic amine


Also found in: Acronyms.

heterocyclic amine

Any of a family of potentially carcinogenic compounds present in grilled meat, such as PhIP and A alpha C, which volatalise and may represent a risk factor for malignancy in those who often grill meat (e.g., short-order cooks).

heterocyclic amine

Any of a family of potential carcinogens present in grilled meat–eg, PhIP and AαC, compounds that volatalize. See Animal fat.
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These studies suggest that tea constituents inhibit the enzyme(s) which generate the aryl nitrenium ion and directly scavenge the reactive electrophile, whereas CHL complexes with heterocyclic amines and facilitates the degradation of active metabolites.
A growing body of data suggests, however, that well-done meat, rife with heterocyclic amines (HCAs), poses a substantial, preventable cancer threat.
Study of the forces of stabilizing complexes between chlorophylls and heterocyclic amine mutagens.
Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are carcinogens in the food supply, but as food items not implicated in the aetiology of colorectal cancer may actually be greater contributors to the total dietary intake of these compounds than red meat, they do not provide a plausible basis for implicating red meat in carcinogenesis.
Effect of cooking temperature on the formation of heterocyclic amines in fried meat products and pan residues.
Cooking meat at high temperatures produces heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, compounds that potentially promote cancer development (Felton, Knize, Salmon, Malfatti, & Kulp, 2002).
These highly potent inhibitory effects of dibenzoylmethane against heterocyclic amines observed in our preliminary investigations strongly warrant further studies of its efficacy as a cancer chemopreventive agent.
Protective properties of chlorophylls against the covalent binding of heterocyclic amines to DNA in vitro and in vivo.
Scientists have known for years that cooking food - grilling it, in particular - produces chemicals known as heterocyclic amines, formed by heating natural components in the meat.
Last week, it was trans-fatty acids in margarine; this week, the heterocyclic amines produced when we grill chicken and beef on backyard barbecues.
Processed, charred, and well-done meats can contain cancer-causing heterocyclic amines, which form when meat is seared at high temperatures, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which get into food when it's charcoal broiled.
Scott Smith, professor of food chemistry, and a K-State research team have been looking at ready-to-eat meat products to determine their levels of heterocyclic amines, or HCAs.