heteroblastic


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Related to heteroblastic: heteroblasty

heteroblastic

 [het″er-o-blas´tik]
originating in a different kind of tissue.

het·er·o·blas·tic

(het'er-ō-blas'tik),
Developing from more than a single type of tissue.
[hetero- + G. blastos, germ]

heteroblastic

/het·ero·blas·tic/ (-blas´tik) originating in a different kind of tissue.

heteroblastic

[het′ərōblas′tik]
Etymology: Gk, heteros + blastos, germ
developing from different germ layers or kinds of tissue rather than from a single type. Compare homoblastic.

het·er·o·blas·tic

(het'ĕr-ō-blas'tik)
Developing from more than a single type of tissue.
[hetero- + G. blastos, germ]

heteroblastic

originating in a different kind of tissue.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Rutile (1%) occurs as heteroblastic and subidioblastic individuals (included in titanite and actinolite) of coppery red color, but also developing reaction textures with titanite.
Hornblende (10%) of heteroblastic and subidioblastic character occurs in individuals of pale green color and intense pleochroism from yellow-green to blue-green color.
Hornblende (48%) forms heteroblastic and subidioblastic individuals, strongly fractured, of tabular-prismatic shape with intense pleochroism varying shades of green to brown.
Podophyllum peltatum) have been shown to be strongly heteroblastic (Holm, 1899; Jones & Watson, 2001) during the development of the leaf series, which consists of rhizome scales, bud scales, and a single or two foliage leaves in vegetative and reproductive shoots, respectively (Jones, 2001).
The spines of the long shoots might play a role in preventing predation, as it has been demonstrated in several spiny, heteroblastic species found mainly on islands (McGlone & Webb, 1981; Givnish et al.
orthologs of the factors controlling abaxial-adaxial and proximal-distal differentiation, as well as genes involved in leaf complexity will shed light on the regulation and conservation of these genetic modules in a heteroblastic species.
To demonstrate that heteroblastic changes are indeed functionally important under current ecological conditions, we face a prominent problem, since different processes are likely to co-occur during ontogeny.
Unfortunately, during the last decades the usage of the term "heteroblasty" has changed considerably, and it has become customary to describe even slight changes in leaf size and/or leaf shape during ontogeny as heteroblastic (e.
The consistency over three years in the position along the shoot of different leaf shapes suggests that the pattern of heteroblastic expression is not highly sensitive to yearly environmental fluctuation under these growth conditions.
A heteroblastic series of shape changes such as that in sororia, from less-lobed to lobed leaves, may have several functional consequences for the plant (see also Ray, 1990).
Changes of timing and rate of cell division during leaf development are the major developmental causes that lead to the formation of heteroblastic leaves on the same stem in some plants (Dengler, 1992; Kaplan, 1973a, 1980; Richards, 1983).
Comparative developmental analysis of the heteroblastic leaf series of axillary shoots of Acorus calamus L.