Herring


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Related to Herring: sardines

Her·ring

(her'ing),
Percy T., English physiologist, 1872-1967. See: Herring bodies.
References in classic literature ?
'To roam, yea, roam, and roam!' "Gently the Badgers trotted to the shore The sandy shore that fringed the bay: Each in his mouth a living Herring bore-- Those aged ones waxed gay: Clear rang their voices through the ocean's roar,
"The Herrings' Song wants anuvver tune, Sylvie," he said.
"The Badgers did not care to talk to Fish: They did not dote on Herrings' songs: They never had experienced the dish To which that name belongs: And oh, to pinch their tails,' (this was their wish,)
Sit down here, friend, and partake of this herring. Understand first, however, that there are certain conditions attached to it."
"The milk you shall have and the bread also, friend, together with the herring, but you must hold the scales between us."
"If he hold the herring he holds the scales, my sapient brother," cried the fat man.
"I have some small stock of learning," Alleyne answered, picking at his herring, "but I have been at neither of these places.
As he approached he saw that they had five dried herrings laid out in front of them, with a great hunch of wheaten bread and a leathern flask full of milk, but instead of setting to at their food they appeared to have forgot all about it, and were disputing together with flushed faces and angry gestures.
For, hark ye: granting, propter argumentum , that I am a talker, then the true reasoning runs that since all men of sense should avoid me, and thou hast not avoided me, but art at the present moment eating herrings with me under a holly-bush, ergo you are no man of sense, which is exactly what I have been dinning into your long ears ever since I first clapped eyes on your sunken chops."
"You double thief!" he cried, "you have eaten my herrings, and I without bite or sup since morning."
The men went into the dining-room and went up to a table, laid with six sorts of spirits and as many kinds of cheese, some with little silver spades and some without, caviar, herrings, preserves of various kinds, and plates with slices of French bread.
"Mamma," said Rosamond, "when Fred comes down I wish you would not let him have red herrings. I cannot bear the smell of them all over the house at this hour of the morning."