herpetic whitlow


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whitlow

 [hwit´lo]
herpetic whitlow a primary herpes simplex infection of the terminal segment of a finger, usually seen in those exposed to infected oral or respiratory secretions, such as dentists, physicians, or nurses. It begins with intense itching and pain, followed by the formation of deep coalescing vesicles. The process is associated with much tissue destruction and may be accompanied by systemic symptoms. A similar lesion may occur as a result of nail biting during the course of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis.
melanotic whitlow a malignant tumor of the nail bed characterized by formation of melanotic tissue.

her·pet·ic whit·low

painful herpes simplex virus infection of a finger from direct inoculation of the unprotected perionychial fold, often accompanied by lymphangitis and regional adenopathy, lasting up to several weeks; most common in physicians, dentists, and nurses as a result of exposure to the virus in a patient's mouth.

herpetic whitlow

cutaneous herpes simplex on the terminal segment of a finger, resulting in formation of deep coalescing vesicles with tissue destruction.
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Herpetic whitlow

herpetic whitlow

An acute HS-induced paronychia seen in occupationally-exposed health care workers–eg, in neurosurgery units, appearing as periungual blisters with a honeycombed appearance, followed by purulence, with regional lymphadenopathy. See Herpes simplex, Whitlow.

her·pet·ic whit·low

(hĕr-pet'ik wit'lō)
Painful herpes simplex virus infection of a finger from direct inoculation of the unprotected perionychial fold, often accompanied by lymphangitis and regional adenopathy, lasting up to several weeks; most common in physicians, dentists, and nurses as a result of exposure to the virus in a patient's mouth. Formerly called felon.

her·pet·ic whit·low

(hĕr-pet'ik wit'lō)
Painful herpes simplex virus infection of one or more fingers resulting from direct inoculation of the unprotected perionychial fold, often accompanied by lymphangitis and regional adenopathy; common in dentists, physicians, and nurses.