herpes gladiatorum


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her·pes gla·di·a·to'·rum

herpes simplex infection associated with trauma to cutaneous tissue.
Herpes simplex-1-induced lesions of the eyes and skin of the head, neck, trunk, or extremities, accompanied by lymphadenopathy, sore throat, fever, chills and headache, often described in wrestlers and rugby players

herpes gladiatorum

Traumatic herpes Sports medicine H simplex-1-induced lesions of the eyes and skin of the head, neck, trunk, or extremities, accompanied by lymphadenopathy, sore throat, fever, chills and headache, described in modern 'gladiators'–eg, wrestlers and rugby players. See Herpes simplex. Cf Tinea gladiatorum.
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The effectiveness of valacyclovir in preventing reactivation of herpes gladiatorum in wrestlers.
Acne, eczema, herpes gladiatorum, and poison ivy may mimic the appearance of impetigo.
Athletes should be checked for HSV lesions before participating in contact sports to avoid the spread of herpes gladiatorum.
Valacyclovir to expedite the clearance of recurrent herpes gladiatorum.
Herpes gladiatorum is usually caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1).
At an annual Minneapolis wrestling camp, for example, an average of 15 participants per session have developed herpes gladiatorum over the past 14 years.
Wrestlers with herpes gladiatorum have small blisters, technically called vesicles, just like those seen on children with chickenpox.
Herpes gladiatorum is most commonly found on wrestlers' heads and necks, and usually on the right side.
He has treated many students with herpes gladiatorum in his role as team physician for the university's wrestling team.
Among those wrestlers who had herpes gladiatorum for fewer than 2 years, the recurrence rate during the course of a competitive season was 42.
Herpes gladiatorum is the name for the skin infection caused by Herpes simplex I found in wrestlers and rugby players.
Editorial Note: Herpes gladiatorum (cutaneous infection with HSV in wrestlers and rugby players) was first described in the mid-1960s (1-3).