herpangina


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herpangina

 [herp″an-ji´nah]
an infectious disease caused by either group A or B coxsackievirus or by echoviruses, chiefly affecting young children in the summer, and characterized by vesiculoulcerative lesions on the mucous membranes of the mouth and throat, dysphagia, fever, vomiting, and prostration.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

her·pan·gi·na

(her-pan'ji-nă),
A disease caused by types of Coxsackievirus and marked by vesiculopapular lesions about 1-2 mm in diameter that are present around the fauces and soon break down to form grayish yellow ulcers; accompanied by sudden onset of fever, loss of appetite, dysphagia, sore throat, and sometimes abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.
[G. herpēs, vesicular eruption, + L. angina, quinsy, fr. ango, to strangle]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

herpangina

An acute painful infection of the mouth of young children, typically caused by coxsackie virus A, less commonly by coxsackievirus B or echoviruses. Herpangina has also been used for recurrent herpetiform ulcers lesions, including canker sores (recurrent aphthous stomatitis).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

herpangina

Infectious disease A coxsackievirus infection characterized by a prodrome with fever, sore throat, headache, followed by painful papules that ulcerate. See Coxsackievirus.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

her·pan·gi·na

(hĕr-pan'ji-nă)
A disease caused by types of Coxsackie virus and marked by vesiculopapular lesions around the fauces that break down to form grayish yellow ulcers.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

herpangina

A virus infection mainly affecting children under 7 and featuring fever, severe sore throat, loss of appetite (anorexia), and greyish-white blister-like spots on and around the tonsils. Herpangina is caused by a coxsackie virus and is similar to HAND, FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

her·pan·gi·na

(hĕr-pan'ji-nă)
Disease caused by Coxsackievirus marked by vesiculopapular lesions about 1-2 mm in diameter that are present around the fauces and soon break down to form grayish yellow ulcers.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Epidemiologic features of hand-foot-mouth disease and herpangina caused by enterovirus 71 in Taiwan, 1998-2005.
Seasonal models of herpangina and hand-foot-mouth disease to simulate annual fluctuations in urban warming in Tokyo.
Poovorawan, "Prevalence of human enterovirus among patients with hand, foot, and mouth disease and herpangina in Thailand, 2013," SoutheastAsian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, vol.
For non-enveloped viruses HRV14 (responsible for the majority of acute respiratory infections in both children and adults) and coxsackievirus type 9 (CA9--tend to infect the skin and mucous membranes, causing herpangina, acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis, and hand-foot-and-mouth (HFM) disease) were included in the analyses.
CV including CVA and CVB mainly leads to herpangina and human heart disease, especially viral myocarditis (VMC).
Infective included the bacterial, fungal and viral diseases; such as primary herpetic gingivostomatitis, herpes zoster, herpangina, infectious mononucleosis, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, tuberculosis, syphilis, actinomycosis and HIV infection.
Herpangina usually affects children, but also adults.
poliomyelitis, aseptic meningitis, hand-foot-mouth disease, herpangina and acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis.
We categorized the doctors' diagnoses into (a) upper respiratory tract infections (URI), comprising URI, pharyngitis, and tonsillitis; (b) lower respiratory infections (LRI), including bronchiolitis, bronchitis, bronchopneumonia, or pneumonia; and (c) herpangina (if an oral ulcer over the throat or uvula was present).