heroic

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he·ro·ic

(hē-rō'ik),
Denoting an aggressive, daring procedure in a dangerously ill patient that, in itself may endanger the patient but also has a possibility of being successful, whereas lesser action would inevitably result in failure.
[G. hērōikos, pertaining to a hero]

he·ro·ic

(hēr-ō'ik)
Denoting an aggressive, daring procedure in a dangerously ill patient that may endanger the patient but that also has a possibility of being successful, whereas lesser action would result in therapeutic failure.
[G. hērōikos, pertaining to a hero]

he·ro·ic

(hēr-ō'ik)
Denoting an aggressive, daring procedure in a dangerously ill patient that, in itself, may endanger the patient but also has a possibility of being successful, whereas lesser action would inevitably result in failure.
[G. hērōikos, pertaining to a hero]
References in periodicals archive ?
But in the present crisis the author wonders "Whether the hair-brain'dness of the present world, will give leasure enough to most, to dwell upon any thing at all, much less to practise Heroical Vertues with such a constant settledness as is necessary, being the chief intention of the Authour (as I conceive) in writing of this Romance." Here the author may be suggesting that the sheer length of the romance is well suited to "the hairbrain'dness of the present world": if romance doesn't speak to our passions, it will at least try our patience and so educate us to constancy and voluntary subjection.
The kindred of him hath been flesh'd upon us, And he is bred out of that bloody strain That haunted us in our familiar paths; Witness our too much memorable shame When Cressy battle fatally was struck, And all our princes captiv'd by the hand Of that black name, Edward, Black Prince of Wales, Whiles that his mountain sire, on mountain standing, Up in the air, crown'd with the golden sun, Saw his heroical seed, and smil'd to see him, Mangle the work of nature, and deface The patterns that by God and by French fathers Had twenty years been made.
Being an instruction for attayning the French tongue (1605); Minerva Britanna, or a garden of heroical devises ([1612]); Fasciculus florum (1617), further described in the second edition as a hand-full of flowers (1618).
To register a "heroical temper" in the last act, Joseph Knight wrote, "he lengthened out the syllables of words until they seemed interminable, and his utterance grew inarticulate--he marred the presentation by grimace and by extravagance of gesture." Directly modeling his actions on Kean (as G.
Women's Matters focuses on Shakespeare's earlier history plays: King John, Richard III, and most importantly, the three Henry VI plays, which have not received this kind of sustained attention since David Riggs's Shakespeare's Heroical Histories (1971).
32 Harington, Orlando Furioso in English Heroical Verse, 4.
As Sir Philip Sidney puts it in the Apology, "all concurreth to the maintaining the heroical, which is not only a kind, but the best and most accomplished kind of poetry." (48) Consequently, writing an epic is a perfectly appropriate task for a poet-king (indeed, it might be the only genre worthy of a king).
(16) In her essay 'Hand-me-Down-Heroics: Shakespeare's Retrospective of Popular Elizabethan Heroical Drama in Henry V, Shakespeare's English Histories: A Quest for Form and Genre, John W.
Seeing the work of a lifetime all set out, one's first reaction is to the great range and variety of it--in scale, from epigrams to fairly lengthy ~apochryphal letters', ~a kind of dramatic monologue similar to the form Michael Drayton used in England's Heroical Epistles (1597)'-- but, much more importantly, in content, tone and style.
Such sentiment was to be repeated in the Heroical Epistles (2:209-10), and then again in the Poly Olbion (5.45-56); although in the latter case only the prophecy is mentioned, Merlin's association with it is certainly inferred.
Williams describes her friend as "one of the most accomplished women that France has produced" and a "cultivated and ardent supporter of Liberty" who showed "heroical firmness" before the tribunal (1:195-97).
The narrator consistently portrays them as exceptional natures, resplendent in "the very shining force of excellent virtue," "true magnaminity," "unshaked magnaminity," "true valor," "heroical greatness," and "extraordinary majesty."(30) The story as a whole comes close to implying that its heroes are a law unto themselves; the conclusion thus refers to them as "peerless princes" (417), despite the fact that they have abducted two members of the royal family and deceived the others.