heritability


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her·i·ta·bil·i·ty

(her'i-tă-bil'i-tē),
1. In psychometrics, a statistical term used to denote the extent of variance of a person's total score or response that is attributable to a presumed genetic component, in contrast to an acquired component.
2. In genetics, a statistical term used to denote the proportion of phenotypic variance due to variance in genotypes that is genetically determined, denoted by the traditional symbol h2.
[see heredity]

heritability

Genetics The likelihood of suffering from a hereditary disease when the defective gene is in a person's gene pool. See Additive genetic variance, Genetic variance, Phenotypic variance, Population.

her·i·ta·bil·i·ty

(her'i-tă-bil'i-tē)
1. psychometrics A statistical term used to denote the extent of variance of a subject's total score or response that is attributable to a presumed genetic component, in contrast to an acquired component.
2. genetics A statistical term used to denote the proportion of phenotypic variance due to variance in genotypes that is genetically determined, denoted by the traditional symbol h2.

heritability (h2)

the proportion of all phenotypic variance in a population that is due to genetic differences and which can be assessed in terms of two main ways, BROAD-SENSE HERITABILITY and NARROW-SENSE HERITABILITY. Heritability is thus a general measure of genetic variation without which SELECTION (both natural and artificial) could not proceed, and is used widely by plant and animal breeders to predict the likely effect of selection. For example, if heritability values for a character are low this indicates high environmental variability, and suggests that the response to selection would not be very rapid.

her·i·ta·bil·i·ty

(her'i-tă-bil'i-tē)
In genetics, a statistical term used to denote the proportion of phenotypic variance due to variance in genotypes that is genetically determined, denoted by the traditional symbol h2.

Patient discussion about heritability

Q. Is Autism hereditary? My 3 year old son has been diagnosed with autism last year. I am now pregnant with my second child and am scared that he will too have autism.

A. There is a higher chance that your additional children will have autism too, however its not a given. Be more alert and notice any early signs that your child may develop.

Q. Is Leukemia hereditary? My Grandpa died of Leukemia when he was 50. I am worried that it might be hereditary. Is it?

A. Overall leukemia is not hereditary but there are rare reports of family clusters, that is, more than one case in a family. Therefore, you should consult your Doctor and tell him about your family's medical history.

Q. Is migraine hereditary? If both my parents suffer from migraines does it mean I can't avoid it?

A. Yes, migraines do have a very strong genetic correlation. However, it does not mean that if both your parents have it, you will have it too for 100%. It means only that you have a much higher risk than the regular population, that does not have migraines in their family, to suffer from this condition.

More discussions about heritability
References in periodicals archive ?
Heritability estimates for head and neck traits had a wide range (0.02 to 0.96).
In addition, the reliability of GEBV decreased as the intensity of preselection increased (i.e., a decrease in the preselection percentage), and this trend became more conspicuous as heritability increased.
Vegetative cycle presented a value of 0.23 for broad-sense heritability. This value is considered low compared to the results obtained by PASSOS et al.
The team was then able to estimate heritability from the tree by examining the similarity of life span between relatives.
The results of genetic variance (d2p), phenotypic variance (d2g), heritability percentages in broad sense (h2b.s.) and genetic gain (GA) at 10% selection intensity for eight important quantitative traits showed that most of the [F.sub.2] populations demonstrated moderate to high heritability estimates.
High narrow sense and broad sense heritability estimates observed suggest that the phenotypes of the traits strongly reflect their genotypes [37].
where GA is genetic advance; K is a constant = 20.06 at 5% selection intensity; [[sigma].sub.ph] is square root of phenotypic variance; [H.sup.2] is heritability in the broad sense; and
The estimates of additive, environmental and phenotypic variances and heritability of different persistency indices are given in Table IV.
The average heritability ([h.sup.2]m) for fruit production characteristics, fruit number and fruit mass was high both in the first year of cultivation and for the full cycle.
Keywords: Spring wheat; Photosynthetic characteristics; Drought resistance; Yield; Genetic correlation; Heritability
Heritability ([h.sup.2.sub.NS]) of yield per se was calculated based on regression approach given by Smith and Kinman, (1965).