hereditary

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Related to hereditarily: Inheritably

hereditary

 [hĕ-red´ĭ-tar″e]
transmissible or transmitted from parent to offspring; genetically determined.

he·red·i·tar·y

(hĕ-red'i-ter-ē),
Transmissible from parent to offspring by information encoded in the parental germ cell.
[L. hereditarius; fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

hereditary

(hə-rĕd′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to heredity or inheritance.
b. Transmitted or capable of being transmitted genetically from parent to offspring: a hereditary disease.
2.
a. Passed down from one generation to the next: a hereditary prejudice.
b. Being such or possessed by reason of birth: a hereditary aristocracy.
3. Law
a. Capable of being inherited.
b. Descending from an ancestor to a legal heir; passing down by inheritance.
c. Having title or possession through inheritance.

he·red′i·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
he·red′i·tar′i·ness n.

retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy

A microvascular endotheliopathy of the retina (OMIM:192315) of middle-age onset characterised by telangiectasias, microaneurysms and retinal capillary obliteration beginning in the macula, and microinfarcts of cerebral white matter that often coalesce to form pseudotumours.

Molecular pathology
Caused by defects of TREX1, which encodes a nuclear protein with 3' exonuclease activity.

hereditary

 adjective Transferred via genes from parent to child

he·red·i·tar·y

(hĕr-edi-tar-ē)
Transmissible from parent to offspring by information encoded in the parental germ cell.
[L. hereditarius; fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

Hereditary

Something which is inherited-passed down from parents to offspring. In biology and medicine, the word pertains to inherited genetic characteristics.
Mentioned in: Amniocentesis, Ptosis

hereditary

Pertains to a condition that is genetically transmitted from parent to offspring. See acquired; congenital; familial; inheritance.

he·red·i·tar·y

(hĕr-edi-tar-ē)
Transmissible from parent to offspring by information encoded in the parental germ cell.
[L. hereditarius; fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

Patient discussion about hereditary

Q. Is Autism hereditary? My 3 year old son has been diagnosed with autism last year. I am now pregnant with my second child and am scared that he will too have autism.

A. There is a higher chance that your additional children will have autism too, however its not a given. Be more alert and notice any early signs that your child may develop.

Q. Is Leukemia hereditary? My Grandpa died of Leukemia when he was 50. I am worried that it might be hereditary. Is it?

A. Overall leukemia is not hereditary but there are rare reports of family clusters, that is, more than one case in a family. Therefore, you should consult your Doctor and tell him about your family's medical history.

Q. Is migraine hereditary? If both my parents suffer from migraines does it mean I can't avoid it?

A. Yes, migraines do have a very strong genetic correlation. However, it does not mean that if both your parents have it, you will have it too for 100%. It means only that you have a much higher risk than the regular population, that does not have migraines in their family, to suffer from this condition.

More discussions about hereditary
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words and phrases : Banach space operator, Hilbert space, compact perturbation, SVEP, hereditarily polaroid, Fredholm.
As broad as the law's original definition of "hereditarily diseased" was, it was inevitable that it would be stretched even further than its Weimar-era authors could have imagined.
The Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring, proclaimed in California on July 14, 1933, required physicians to register every case of hereditary illness known to them, except in women over 45 years of age.
An operator T is called hereditarily normaloid, if every part of it is normaloid.
Assignments to the dual kingship were hereditarily determined by membership of two ancient families, the Agiads and Eurypontids.
* Every person shall have the freedom to profess and practice his own religion as coming down to him hereditarily have due regard to traditional practices.
According to this finding, some sensible and reasonable interpretations can be made such as the needed conditions for teacher efficacy are primarily gained during the teacher education process, significant features a teacher should have, are not transmitted hereditarily and sex of a teacher does not affect teacher efficacy.
"I don't think he ever would have chosen to pursue a life of witchcraft and magic without it having been hereditarily passed down -- but, now that he has these powers, he quite likes being a leader and trying to keep the sanity in the coven." "I think he enjoys the powers for amusement and goodness at this point," Dekker continues, "but the good thing about this show, and I think it's the case for most of us, is that, when you're dealing with witchcraft, you're dealing with the light and the dark.
It is believed to be passed down hereditarily, in some cases, or to be acquired due to some individual weakness or social vulnerability, such as being alone, mocking Zar spirits, or not being spiritually protected.
Puppy buyers should seek this information, for it will help them find hereditarily healthy litters of puppies.
Sihle argues that while the noncelibate sngags pa are hereditarily associated with either Buddhism or Bon, the ala cannot be readily categorized as one or the other.
[,] hereditarily, more or less of well defined physical characteristics which distinguish them fairly from all other strains or races." (47) These varying, imprecise definitions of "race" in themselves reflected the ambiguity of the concept.