hepatojugular reflux


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Related to hepatojugular reflux: hepatojugular reflex

reflux

 [re´fluks]
a backward or return flow; see also backflow and regurgitation (def. 1).
esophageal reflux (gastroesophageal reflux) reflux of the stomach contents into the esophagus.
hepatojugular reflux distention of the jugular vein induced by applying manual pressure over the liver; it suggests insufficiency of the right heart.
intrarenal reflux reflux of urine into the renal parenchyma.
vesicoureteral reflux (vesicoureteric reflux) backward flow of urine from the bladder into a ureter.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

he·pa·to·jug·u·lar re·flux

an elevation of venous pressure visible in the jugular veins and measurable in the veins of the arm, produced in active or impending congestive heart failure and constrictive pericarditis by firm pressure with the flat hand over the abdomen. Often called hepatojugular reflux when pressure is exclusively over the liver.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

abdominal jugular reflux

An increase in JVP which follows 10–30 seconds of pressure placed on the periumbilical region, due to an increase in flow of blood from the abdominal veins into the right atrium.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

he·pa·to·jug·u·lar re·flux

(hep'ă-tō-jŭg'yū-lăr rē'flŭks)
An elevation of venous pressure visible in the jugular veins and measurable in the veins of the arm, produced in active or impending congestive heart failure by firm pressure with the flat hand over the liver for 30-60 seconds.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hepatojugular reflux

A visible upward movement of the jugular vein pulse in the neck on pressure on the abdomen. This is a way of distinguishing venous from arterial pulsation.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005