hepatofugal

hep·a·to·fu·gal

(hep'ă-tō-fyū'găl),
Directed away from the liver, usually referring to portal blood flow.

hep·a·to·fu·gal

(hep'ă-tŏf'yū-gŭl)
Away from the liver, usually referring to portal blood flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arterial portography is another method of navigation, which requires intra-arterial injection of contrast, although visualization of the PV can be suboptimal, particularly if there is hepatofugal PV flow (26).
Liver Grade 1 (chronic liver disease): coarse echotexture, +- irregular surface, +- blunt or rounded margin, portal vein caliber 13 mm and a hepatopetal velocity of <15 cm/sec or a hepatofugal flow.
6) The normal waveform demonstrates 2 hepatofugal peaks reflecting right atrial filing during ventricular systole and diastole, followed by a hepatopetal peak from retrograde flow into the hepatic veins during atrial contraction.
It was hepatopetal in 46 (92 Percent) and hepatofugal in 4(8 Percent) patients.
Na hipertensao portal em grau mais avancado, tambem e possivel detectar fluxo hepatofugal ao Doppler, o qual e considerado anormal em qualquer segmento da veia porta.
In these patients, the lungs and abdominal lymph nodes are the most common sites of metastasis possibly due to hepatofugal portosystemic shunting (ie, flow directed away from the liver to the systemic circulation) induced by splenic vein obstruction or to the presence of aggressive features of the primary carcinoma.
Air in portal venous radicals assumes a peripheral, subcapsular location within the liver parenchyma, reflecting the direction of portal venous flow, while air in the biliary tree will have a more central location in the porta hepatis as a consequence of hepatofugal bile flow.
Analysis of hepatofugal flow in portal venous system using ultrasonic Doppler duplex system.
Portal hypertension also can cause blood in the portal venous system to reverse direction, resulting in hepatofugal (ie, away from the liver) flow.
Hepatic veins show normal triphasic waveform (type I) with two hepatofugal and one hepatopetal (retrograde) velocity peaks and abnormal biphasic waveform (Type II) without retrograde flow phase and without reduced oscillation, biphasic with reduced oscillation (type III) and flat (monophasic) waveform ( type IV).
Grant EG et al found in their study that Continuous hepatofugal flow in the portal vein trunk is found with an overall prevalence of 8.