hepatitis B vaccine


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vaccine

 [vak-sēn´]
a suspension of attenuated or killed microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, or rickettsiae), administered for prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious diseases.
anthrax vaccine a cell-free protein extract of cultures of Bacillus anthracis, used for immunization against anthrax.
attenuated vaccine a vaccine prepared from live microorganisms or viruses cultured under adverse conditions, leading to loss of their virulence but retention of their ability to induce protective immunity.
autogenous vaccine a vaccine prepared from microorganisms which have been freshly isolated from the lesion of the patient who is to be treated with it.
bacterial vaccine a preparation of killed or attenuated bacteria used as an active immunizing agent.
BCG vaccine see bcg vaccine.
cholera vaccine a preparation of killed Vibrio cholerae, administered intradermally, subcutaneously, or intramuscularly for immunization against cholera.
diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine DTP vaccine: a combination of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine; administered intramuscularly for simultaneous immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough. When the pertussis vaccine is an acellular form, the combination may be abbreviated DTaP.
diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine adsorbed and Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine a combination of diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, pertussis vaccine, and Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine; administered intramuscularly to children 18 months to 5 years of age for simultaneous immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, and infection by Haemophilus influenzae type b.
Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine (HbCV) a preparation of Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide covalently bound to diphtheria toxoid or to a specific diphtheria protein, meningococcal protein, or tetanus protein; it stimulates both B and T lymphocyte responses and is much more immunogenic than the polysaccharide vaccine. Administered intramuscularly as a routine immunizing agent in infants and young children.
Haemophilus b polysaccharide vaccine (HbPV) a preparation of highly purified capsular polysaccharide derived from Haemophilus influenzae type b, which stimulates an immune response in B lymphocytes only; administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously as an immunizing agent in children ages 18 months to 5 years.
hepatitis A vaccine inactivated an inactivated whole virus vaccine derived from an attenuated strain of hepatitis A virus grown in cell culture; administered intramuscularly.
hepatitis B vaccine a preparation of hepatitis B surface antigen, derived either from human plasma of carriers of hepatitis B (hepatitis B vaccine inactivated) or from cloning in yeast cells (hepatitis B vaccine [recombinant]); administered intramuscularly.
heterologous vaccine a vaccine that confers protective immunity against a pathogen that shares cross-reacting antigens with the microorganisms in the vaccine.
human diploid cell vaccine rabies vaccine prepared from rabies virus grown in cultures of human diploid embryo lung cells and inactivated; administered intramuscularly or intradermally.
influenza virus vaccine a killed virus vaccine used in immunization against influenza; it is trivalent, usually containing two influenza A virus strains and one influenza B virus strain.
live vaccine a vaccine prepared from live microorganisms that have been attenuated but retain their immunogenic properties.
Lyme disease vaccine (recombinant OspA) a preparation of outer surface protein A (OspA), a cell surface lipoprotein of Borrelia burgdorferi, produced by recombinant technology; administered intramuscularly for active immunization against lyme disease.
measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine live (MMR) a combination of live attenuated measles, mumps, and rubella viruses, administered subcutaneously for simultaneous immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella.
measles and rubella virus vaccine live a combination of live attenuated measles and rubella viruses, administered subcutaneously for simultaneous immunization against measles and rubella.
measles virus vaccine live a live attenuated virus vaccine used for immunization against measles, although it is usually administered as the combination measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine.
meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine a preparation of a capsular antigen of Neisseria meningitidis, administered subcutaneously to provide immunity to meningitis.
mumps virus vaccine live a live attenuated virus vaccine used in immunization against mumps; usually administered as the combination measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine.
pertussis vaccine a preparation of killed Bordetella pertussis bacilli (whole-cell vaccine) or of purified antigenic components thereof (acellular vaccine), used to immunize against pertussis; generally used in combination with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DTP or DTaP).
plague vaccine a preparation of killed Yersinia pestis bacilli, administered intramuscularly as an active immunizing agent against plague.
pneumococcal heptavalent conjugate vaccine a preparation of capsular polysaccharides from the seven serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae most commonly isolated from children 6 years of age or younger, coupled to a nontoxic variant of diphtheria toxin; used as an active immunizing agent for infants and children at risk for pneumococcal disease, administered intramuscularly.
pneumococcal vaccine polyvalent a preparation of purified capsular polysaccharides from the 23 serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing the majority of pneumococcal disease; used as an active immunizing agent in persons over 2 years of age, administered intramuscularly.
poliovirus vaccine inactivated (IPV) a preparation of killed polioviruses of three types, given in a series of intramuscular or subcutaneous injections to immunize against poliomyelitis. It does not induce intestinal immunity and so is not effective for poliovirus eradication in areas where wild-type polioviruses still exist in large numbers. However, it does not cause vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and so is preferred for routine immunization in areas where the risk of infection by a wild-type poliovirus is very low, as in the United States. Called also Salk vaccine.
poliovirus vaccine live oral (OPV) an oral vaccine against poliomyelitis consisting of three types of live, attenuated polioviruses. It is given orally, often on a sugar cube, and so is convenient for administration to children and large groups of people. It induces both humoral and intestinal immunity, so is useful for immunization and poliomyelitis eradication in areas where wild-type polioviruses have not been eradicated. However, it can cause vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in persons newly vaccinated with it and their contacts, which is considered an unjustifiable risk in countries such as the United States, where the risk of exposure to wild-type polioviruses is very low. Thus, for routine immunization in the United States, it has been superseded by poliovirus vaccine inactivated. Called also Sabin vaccine.
polyvalent vaccine a vaccine prepared from cultures or antigens of more than one strain or species.
purified chick embryo cell vaccine an inactivated virus vaccine used for pre- and postexposure rabies immunization, prepared from rabies virus grown in cultures of chicken fibroblasts; administered intramuscularly.
rabies vaccine any of various vaccines against rabies consisting of inactivated virus, used for preexposure immunization to persons at high risk of exposure, such as veterinarians, and for postexposure prophylaxis in conjunction with rabies immune globulin. See human diploid cell v., purified chick embryo cell v., and rabies v. adsorbed.
rabies vaccine adsorbed (RVA) a rabies vaccine prepared from rabies virus grown in cultures of fetal rhesus monkey lung and inactivated; administered intramuscularly.
rotavirus vaccine live oral a live virus vaccine produced from a mixture of four types of rotavirus, used to immunize infants against rotaviral gastroenteritis.
rubella and mumps virus vaccine live a combination of live attenuated rubella and mumps viruses, administered subcutaneously for simultaneous immunization against rubella and mumps.
rubella virus vaccine live a live attenuated virus vaccine used for immunization against rubella, usually administered as the combination measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine.
subunit vaccine a vaccine produced from specific protein subunits of a virus and thus having less risk of adverse reactions than whole virus vaccines.
typhoid vaccine any of several preparations of Salmonella typhi used for immunization against typhoid fever, including a parenteral heat- and phenol-inactivated bacteria vaccine, an oral live vaccine prepared from the attenuated strain Ty21a, and a parenteral vaccine prepared from typhoid Vi capsular polysaccharide.
varicella virus vaccine live a preparation of live, attenuated human herpesvirus 3 (varicella-zoster virus) administered subcutaneously for production of immunity to varicella and herpes zoster.
yellow fever vaccine a preparation of attenuated yellow fever virus, used to immunize against yellow fever.

hep·a·ti·tis B vac·cine

originally a formalin-inactivated vaccine prepared from the surface antigen (HBsAg) of the hepatitis B virus; the antigen was formerly obtained from the plasma of human carriers of the virus; today in the U.S., purified HBsAg is now primarily prepared by recombinant DNA technology and is used almost exclusively for immunization.

hepatitis B vaccine

a vaccine prepared from the blood plasma of asymptomatic human carriers of hepatitis B virus. A series of three doses is recommended to achieve immunity. The vaccine is advised particularly for people who are likely to have contact with blood or fluids of affected people, such as nurses, physicians, dentists, dental hygienists, and laboratory personnel.

hepatitis B vaccine (recombinant)

a genetically engineered vaccine produced in yeast cells by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology.

hepatitis B vaccine

Engerix-B®, recombinant HBV vaccine Hepatology A vaccination that provides prolonged protection  against hepatitis B  At-risk groups Healthcare workers, dentists, intimate and household contacts of Pts with chronic hepatitis B infection, ♂ homosexuals, those with multiple sexual partners, dialysis Pts, IV drug users, recipients of repeated transfusions

hepatitis B vaccine

A vaccine containing inactivated hepatitis B virus surface antigen produced by recombinant DNA technology and adsorbed on aluminium hydroxide. The vaccine is given to people at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B. These include close family contacts of a patient with hepatitis B, intravenous drug abusers, sexually promiscuous people, patients on haemodialysis, those receiving frequent blood transfusions and medical staff in regular contact with blood or body fluids or tissues. The drug is on the WHO official list.

Patient discussion about hepatitis B vaccine

Q. Should I vaccinate my newborn against Hepatitis B? I am 9 months pregnant and am expecting to give birth anytime soon. I understood that my newborn will receive a vaccine against Hepatitis B in the hospital. Why is this so?

A. because this is bullshit! Hey! Wake up! the lymph system of your baby will only be "ready and finished" after three years! so how should your baby manage a toxic vaccination? do you know what they put in the vaccination? they put hepatitis B pathogens/virus with the hope that your baby will be able to build an anti-hepatitis B pathogen and so manage itself in the future hepatitis B! how should your baby do that, when his lymph-system just started to develop itself and will only be ready in three years? please read in the links i send to you:

before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.

Q. can the hepatitis b vaccination cause a soar throat?

A. yes it can be very probable!

before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.

More discussions about hepatitis B vaccine
References in periodicals archive ?
Infants born to mothers who test positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg): Administer the hepatitis B vaccine and HBIG within 12 hours of birth.
It is reported that individuals over 30 years may have an increased risk of non-response to hepatitis B vaccine, as compared to the younger persons21 but this was not seen in the present study.
The antibodies drawn forth by the hepatitis B vaccine specifically target the surface antigen protein.
A previously healthy 3-month-old Michigan infant who had nor received her first dose of hepatitis B vaccine until she was 2.
Bonnie Dunbar, a cellular biologist at Baylor College of Medicine, began researching hepatitis B vaccine reactions after her brother developed autoimmune and neurological dysfunction following vaccination.
Because the cost of inoculating officers with the hepatitis B vaccine is approximately $130 per officer, this regulation may impact on agencies' budgets.
According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, your child needs three doses of hepatitis B vaccine to be fully protected against hepatitis B infection.
In the end, this report discusses the 10 million pieces/year Hepatitis B vaccine project feasibility analysis and investment return analysis, and gives related research conclusions and development trend analysis.
Whether a birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine is safe and effective is critical in deciding on giving a birth dose.
The fourth bullet should read, "Test for HBsAg and antibody to HBsAg 1-2 mos after completion of [greater than or equal to]3 doses of a licensed hepatitis B vaccine series (i.
listened intently to testimony from "victims" of the hepatitis B vaccine and to individuals allied with the National Vaccine Information Center (NVIC), who demanded more state philosophical exemption laws allowing parents to opt out of having their children vaccinated against hepatitis B.
In this study, half of the children received three shots of the malaria vaccine and the other half received three shots of hepatitis B vaccine.
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