hepatic hydrothorax


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

hepatic hydrothorax

A pleural effusion associated with cirrhosis of the liver, typically on the right side of the chest, above the liver.
See also: hydrothorax
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Multiple small-power studies have discussed the complications of chest tube placement for hepatic hydrothorax such as subcutaneous emphysema, organ puncture, haemothorax due to artery laceration, pulmonary edema from rapid removal of fluid (reexpansion pulmonary edema), misplacement of chest tube, protein and electrolyte depletion, infection, bleeding, and death [8, 24-26].
devised a new technique by using a pigtail catheter with a small caliber (22 gauge) for treating recurrent hepatic hydrothorax and, also, concluded that chest tube insertion for hepatic hydrothorax is associated with high complication rate and should be avoided [26].
Chest tube placement for hepatic hydrothorax has two times higher mortality and longer length of stay compared to those who underwent thoracentesis.
Chopra, "Review article: hepatic hydrothorax," Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol.
Hiraishi, "Diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with intraperitoneal injection of Sonazoid," Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol.
Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery with talc pleurodesis in the management of symptomatic hepatic hydrothorax. Am J Gastroenterol 2002:97:3172-3175
Chemical pleurodesis in patients with hepatic hydrothorax: management, morbidity and mortality.
Both, though temporary measures, are perhaps the best available bridging to liver transplantation in selected patients with refractory hepatic hydrothorax (2,3).
Hepatic hydrothorax: Current concepts of pathophysiology and treatment options.
Post procedure results showed that 7 out of the 22 cases reported absence of any complications and were not associated with recurrence of hepatic hydrothorax. The remaining cases (15 patients) showed early and mostly minimal and limited morbidity.
Despite numerous reports describing the clinical features, pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic hydrothorax, the optimal or standard therapy has not been established [8].
Although, thoracocentesis is the most effective method for rapid relief of dyspnea secondary to massive pleural effusion associated with hepatic hydrothorax, it carries the risk of substantial protein depletion without preventing fluid reaccumulation, especially if repeated thoracocentesis is required [7].