heparin


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heparin

 [hep´ah-rin]
1. an acid mucopolysaccharide present in many tissues, especially the liver and lungs, and having potent anticoagulant properties. It also has lipotrophic properties, promoting transfer of fat from blood to the fat depots by activation of the enzyme lipoprotein lipase.
2. a mixture of active principles capable of prolonging blood clotting time, obtained from domestic animals; used in the prophylaxis and treatment of clotting disorders, such as thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute myocardial infarction, or stroke syndrome, and to prevent clotting during extracorporeal circulation, blood transfusion, and blood sampling.
heparin lock a type of intermittent intravenous device for the administration of heparin. It does not require a continuous flow of fluids; the intravenous fluid flow can be disconnected and the heparin lock filled with a heparin solution that maintains patency of the needle.
Two types of heparin or saline lock sets. From Lammon et al., 1995.

hep·a·rin

(hep'ă-rin),
An anticoagulant principle that is a component of various tissues (especially liver and lung) and mast cells in humans and several mammalian species; its principal and active constituent is a glycosaminoglycan composed of d-glucuronic acid and d-glucosamine, both sulfated, in 1,4-α linkage, of molecular weight between 6,000 and 20,000. In conjunction with a serum protein cofactor (the so-called heparin cofactor), heparin acts as an antithrombin and an antiprothrombin. Synthetic preparations are commonly used in therapeutic anticoagulation. It also enhances activity of "clearing factors" (lipoprotein lipases).
Synonym(s): heparinic acid

heparin

(hĕp′ər-ĭn)
n.
An acidic glycosaminoglycan found especially in lung and liver tissue and having the ability to slow the clotting of blood, used as a drug in the treatment of thrombosis.

heparin

Hematology A sulfated glycosaminoglycan anticoagulant that inhibits activated factors IXa, Xa, XIa, XIIa and thrombin, ↓ local anti-thrombin-III, promoting its inactivation by neutrophil elastase; interaction of heparin with endothelial cells results in displacement of platelet factor 4, which inactivates heparin Indications Thromboembolism, CAD, post acute MI, PTE Monitoring Titrate heparin so that aPTT is 1.5-2.0-fold normal Side effects Hemorrhage, thrombocytopenia, osteoporosis, skin necrosis, alopecia, hypersensitivity, hypoaldosteronism. See Low-molecular weight heparin.

hep·a·rin

(hep'ăr-in)
An anticoagulant that is a component of various tissues (especially liver and lung) and mast cells. Its principal active constituent is a glycosaminoglycan composed of d-glucuronic acid and d-glucosamine. In conjunction with a serum protein cofactor (the so-called heparin cofactor), heparin acts as an antithrombin and an antiprothrombin by preventing platelet agglutination and consequent thrombus formation.

heparin

A complex polysaccharide organic acid found mainly in lung and liver tissue. Heparin is thought to bind to THROMBIN and antithrombin in plasma thereby assisting in their combination and interfering with the cascade of reactions that end in blood clotting (coagulation). From the Greek hepar , the liver. The drug is on the WHO official list. Heparin is widely used as an anticoagulant under brand names such as Calciparine, Canusal, Hepsal, Monoparin and Multiparin. See also LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HEPARIN.

heparin

a mucopolysaccharide molecule produced in the liver and some white blood-cells that acts as an anticoagulant, inhibiting the transformation of prothrombin to thrombin, a vital stage in BLOOD CLOTTING.

Heparin

An organic acid that occurs naturally in the body and prevents blood clots. Heparin is also made synthetically and can be given as a treatment when required.
References in periodicals archive ?
To know the latest trends and insights related to low molecular weight heparin market, click the link below: https://www.coherentmarketinsights.com/market-insight/low-molecular-weight-heparin-market-1491
Modified technique of subcutaneous injection of low-molecular-weight heparin can effectively reduce pain and subcutaneous ecchymosis, which is beneficial to the recovery of patients.
Endogenous heparin activity is decreased in peripheral arterial occlusive disease.
Nobel metal nanoparticles, for example, gold and silver [19-22] and metal oxide ones [23]; conjugates: silica [24] and chitosan [25,26]; and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) [27], complexes [28, 29], and magnetic particles have been synthesized using heparin [30].
In contrast to the anticarcinogenic effect above, heparin may also be involved in the activation of the metastatic cascade by forming a complex with midkine (MK).
The patient received heparin flushes via her port every 8 weeks for the previous 11 years with no adverse reactions.
"Our earlier studies showed that serum heparin levels in mice increased significantly during starvation.
Assessing the clinical and cost impact of on-demand immunoassay testing for the diagnosis of heparin induced thrombocytopenia.
Some, but not all, of the heparin active pharmaceutical ingredients ("API") supplied by SPL to Baxter originated in China.
She was initiated on unfractionated heparin infusion for treatment of pulmonary embolism.
Both heparin and low-molecular-weight-heparins (LMWHs) are injectable subcutaneously, which will always create issues with regards to patient compliance and can carry the risk of hematoma and more seriously, heparininduced thrombocytopenia (HIT).
The risk for thrombotic complications in MPN patients entails a high probability of heparin exposure during the course of the disease which could thereby put MPN patients at increased risk of developing HIT.